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This Book "Priestley's Navigable Rivers and Canals" by Joseph Priestley was previously published in April 1831. NOTE: Oringinally called "Historical Account of the Navigable Rivers, Canals, and Railways, of Great Britain".
For more information see About this Book

Index Page Link to Previous Page 641

page 642

The act empowers the company to raise amongst themselves, £13,000 in shares of £50 each, and if necessary, a further sum of £10,000, by mortgage of the tolls, &c. and to take the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Goods, Wares. Merchandize,&c.carried from, to or between Wilden Ferry and Gainsborough 9d per Ton.
From Wilden Ferry to Newark-upon-Trent, or the contrary 6d ditto.
From Gainsborough to Nottingham Trent Bridge, or the contrary 6d ditto.
From Wilden Ferry to Nottingham Trent Bridge, or to the Nottingham Canal, or the contrary 3d ditto.
From Gainsborough to Newark, or the contrary 3d ditto.
From Nottingham Trent Bridge to Newark, or the contrary 3d ditto.

And in proportion for a greater or less Quantity or Distance.

Only Half the above Rates to be paid for Coal, Plaster and Lime, upon any Part of this Navigation, except for Vessels navigating between Gainsborough and Dunham Shoal, and navigating no higher up the River.

Only a Half-penny per Ton to be paid on Coal, Plaster, Lime or other Goods, Wares, &c. carried on this River to Dunham Shoal and no further up, and so proportionably in case such Coal, &c. shall not be conveyed the whole Distance from Gainsborough to Dunham Shoal; and no Tonnage of any Kind to be paid for Coal, &c. conveyed down the River from Dunham Shoal to Gainsborough, or from any intermediate Place, and not brought from any Place higher up this River than Dunham Shoal.

The annual rent of £5 paid to this company by the proprietors of the Soar Navigation and Erewash Canal to cease, and in lieu thereof, every laden boat, crossing the Trent at such place, to pay sixpence.

No rates to be taken until the sum of £13,000 be expended for the purposes of the act. The profits on this navigation are not to exceed seven per cent.

The same rates to be taken on the cut as those allowed by former acts on the river.

The length of this river from Burton-upon-Trent, where it becomes navigable, to the Humber, is about one hundred and seventeen miles, and the fall to low-water-mark is 118 feet.

This river, connecting the port of Hull with a wide extent of agricultural, milling and manufacturing country, by means of the various rivers and canals which communicate with it, affords an easy means of export for the manufactures of a large district in Lancashire; the salt from Cheshire; the produce of the potteries in Staffordshire; the coal from Derbyshire; and the agricultural produce of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Lincolnshire. It also opens a communication with the sea by way of Lincoln and Boston; through which channels, as well as the Humber, the arti-

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cles above enumerated are conveyed ; and in return, the interior of the country is supplied either by Hull and Gainshorough or Boston and Lincoln, with such commodities as are required by an immense population.

TRENT AND MERSEY CANAL.

6 Geo. III. C. 96, R. A. 14th May, 1766.

10 Geo III C. 102, R. A. 12th April, 1770.

15 Geo. III. C. 20, R. A. 13th April, 1775.

16 Geo. III. C. 32, It. A. 13th May, 1776.

23 Geo. III. C. 33, R. A. 17th April, 1783.

37 Geo. III. C. 36, R. A. 24th Mar. 1797.

37 Geo. III. C. 81, R. A. 6th June, 1797.

42 Geo. III. C. 25, R. A 15th April. 1802.

49 Geo. III. C. 73, R. A. 20th May, 1809.

4 Geo. IV. C. 87, R. A. 17th June, 1823.

8 Geo. IV. C. 81, R. A. 14th June, 1827.

THIS important work commences at a place called Wilden Ferry, in the county of Derby, where the Derwent empties itself into the Trent; thence running in a south-westerly direction, it passes Shardlow, Aston, Weston, Swarkestone (near which it is crossed by the Derby Canal) and Egginton, in the same county; thence continuing to Burton, where it communicates with the River Trent, it proceeds by Wichnor, to its junction with the Coventry and Fazeley Canal at Fradley; from this point, turning to the north-west, it passes by Rugeley to Heywood Mill, where it is joined by the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal; then running by Weston to Stone, it there takes a northerly course, passing Trentham to Stoke, where it is joined by the Newcastle-under-Lyne Canal on the south, and the Caldon Branch runs from the north side of it to near Uttoxeter, and a railway branches from it at a place called Frog Hall to the Caldon Lime Works; and there is also a railway leading from the canal to the coal works above Lane End; continuing its northerly course, it passes Etruria and Burslem to the south end of Harecastle Tunnel in Staffordshire; after passing through the tunnel it is joined by the Macclesfield Canal, and then inclines to the north-west, running by Church Lawton, leaving Sandbach on the north-east, to Middlewich, at which place the Middlewich Branch goes from it; from thence it continues a north-west course, passing the salt pits near Northwich, and through Barnton, Saltersford and Preston Tunnels, to Preston Brook, at which place it communicates with the Duke of Bridgewater's Canal, and from thence proceeds in

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nearly a westerly course to Runcorn Gap, on the River Mersey, in the county of Chester; but this last part has become part of the Duke's Canal.

The first act of parliament, passed in 1766, is entitled, 'An Act for making a navigable Cut or Canal from the River Trent, at or near Wilden Ferry, in the county of Derby, to the River Mersey, at or near Runcorn Gap;' it incorporates the subscribers by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey," and empowers them to raise amongst themselves, for the purposes of the act, the sum of £130,000, in six hundred and fifty shares of £200 each; and they are authorized, by subsequent acts of parliament, to increase their capital to £334,250. This act likewise allows the company to take the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Coal, Stone, Timber and all Kinds of Goods whatever 1½d per Ton, per Mile.

Materials for Roads and Manure are exempted from Tolls, provided they pass through the Locks at such Time as the Waste Water flows over the Weir.

Wharfage Rates for Goods remaining more than Twenty-four Hours, as may be agreed.

By a clause in the act of parliament, the Duke of Bridgewater is to complete that portion of the Trent and Mersey Canal running, from its junction with his own at Preston Brook, to Runcorn, such portion to be his property; he is also to receive those tolls and rates thereon, which are mentioned under the article "Bridgewater Canal."

The acts passed in 1770 and 1775 were for granting further powers to this company, but without any clause which requires extracting.

The act obtained by the company in 1776, is entitled, 'An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey, to make a navigable Canal from the said Navigation, on the South Side of Harecastle, in the county of Stafford, to Frog Hall; and a Railway from thence to or near Caldon, in the said county; and to make other Railways,' and empowers the company to make that branch canal and railway commencing from Stoke, which we have described in the introduction to this article.

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The act of 1783 is merely for amending and comfirming the powers granted by former acts.

That of 1797 is entitled, 'An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey, to make a navigable Canal from and out of a certain Branch of the said Navigation, called the Caldon Canal, at or near Endon, to or near the town of Leek, in the county of Stafford; and also a Reservoir for supplying the several Canals of the said Company with Water;' and authorizes the company to make such branch from the Caldon Branch to the town of Leek.

The act of parliament of 1802 is entitled, 'An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey, to make Railways; to alter the Course of the Railway from Frog Hall to Caldon, and Part of the Course of the Canal from Frog Hall to Uttoxeter; and to amend the Trent and Mersey Canal Acts.' This act, in addition to authorizing several alterations in the lines of the branches from the canal, empowers the company of proprietors to divide the shares which were originally £200 each, into shares of £100 each.

The act of 1809 amends and enlarges the powers given by former acts, without any particular clauses.

The act of 1823 is entitled, 'An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey, to make an additional Tunnel through Harecastle Hill, in the county of Stafford, and an additional Reservoir in Knypersley Valley, in the said county; and to amend and enlarge the Powers of the several Acts for making and maintaining the said Navigation, and the several Canals connected therewith.' By this act it is provided that all goods, wares and merchandize, using the said intended new cut or canal, shall pay an additional rate of three half-pence per ton per mile, and in proportion for a greater and less distance or weight. For completing the additional works, the proprietors are empowered to borrow £60,000 on mortgage of the works and premises of any or all of their canals. With these powers the company entered upon their new plan, as soon as it had received the sanction of the legislature, and the additional tunnel through Harecastle Hill, and the reservoir in Knypersley Valley, were forthwith completed.

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The last act of parliament relating to this navigation was passed in 1827, and is entitled, 'An Act for enabling the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey, to make Two Branches or Cuts from and out of the said Navigation; and for further amending the Acts of the said Company.' By this last act the company are directed to make so much of the line of the Macclesfield Canal as extends from the western part of the regulating pound, in the township of Oddrode, to Hardingswood Lock, in the parish of Audley, and to receive the rates thereon; and the following are ordered to be collected by them as

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Sand, Gravel, Paving-stones, Bricks, Clay, Coal for burning Lime, Lime-stone and Rubble for Roads 1d per Ton, per Mile.
For all Ashler Stone, Slate, Flag, Spar, Coal except for burning Lime, and other Minerals 1½d ditto. ditto.
For all Timber, Lime, Goods, Wares and all other Merchandize, Articles, Matters and Things 2d ditto. ditto.

EXEMPTIONS.

Vessels laden wholly with Dung, Soil, Marl, and Ashes of Coal or Turf for time Improvement of Lands on the Line, are exempted from paying the above Rates, provided they do not pass any Lock, unless the Water is flowing over the Waste Weir of such Lock.

By this act also the company may make a communication with a cut, intended to be made by the Ellesmere and Chester Canal Company at Wardle Green; and the company shall receive for all goods, conveyed on the said intended cut into or upon the said communication, the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Coal, Culm, Coke, Lime-stone and Rock Salt 9d per Ton.
For all Free-stone, Timber, Iron-stone, Slate, Lead-ore, Iron and Lead 9½d ditto.
For all other Goods, Wares, Merchandize or Things 10½d ditto.

By this act also the £200 shares are directed to be divided into shares of £100 each. The company may borrow on mortgage the sum of £20,000, for executing the additional works and for the several other purposes of the act.

It is unnecessary, after what has been said at the commencement of the article, to enter into any minute investigation of the utility of this great national undertaking, whilst to state all the

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difficulties which occurred in the execution thereof, would extend our remarks beyond an ordinary length; suffice it therefore to say, that the line was projected by Mr. Brindley, and executed by him up to the time of his decease, after that by Mr. Henshall. Besides the extensive one over the Dove, there are no less than one hundred and twenty-six aqueducts and culverts, ninety-one locks and six tunnels. The lockage from Harecastle Summit to the Trent, at Wilden Ferry, is 316 feet; the six locks near Wilden Ferry are 14 feet wide, enabling river boats to come up to Burton; the rest only 7 feet; from the summit to the Duke's Canal at Preston Brook, is a lockage of 326 feet. The famous Harecastle Tunnel, two thousand eight hundred and eighty yards long, is situated upon the sumnmit of this canal. The total length of the canal is ninety-three miles.

ULVERSTONE CANAL.

33 George III. Cap. 105, Royal Assent 8th May, 1793.

THE object of this canal is to admit ships to the town of Ulverstone. It commences at Hammerside Hill, in Morecombe Bay, in the Irish Sea, and terminates at the new basin and wharfs at Ulverstone, and is about a mile and a half in length; it is level with high water at ordinary tides, and has a sea lock 112 feet long at its entrance.

The act of parliament authorizing this undertaking, is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Cut or Canal from a Place called Hammerside Hill, in the parish of Ulverstone, in the county palatine of Lancaster, to a Place called Weint End, near the town of Ulverstone aforesaid.' It incorporates the subscribers by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Ulverstone Canal Navigation," and empowers them to raise amongst themselves, for the purposes of the act, the sum of £4,000 in shares of £50 each, and, if necessary, a further sum of £3,000, and to take the following tonnage rates.

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TONNAGE RATES.

For all Merchants' Goods, Bar-iron, Pig-iron, Timber, Coal, &c 6d per Ton.
For all Slate, Lime, Iron-stone, Iron-ore and all Kinds of Ores 4d ditto.

For every Vessel continuing in the Basin or Dock more than Four Days after the Cargo is discharged, One Penny per Ton per Week, to be computed from the Register of the Vessel.

For Goods remaining on Wharfs longer than Twenty-four Hours, such Rate as may be agreed on.

A junction may be formed between this and the Lancaster Canal, and coal, culm and cinders carried from the Lancaster into the Ulverstone Canal, are not liable to the sea duty.

Mr. John Rennie was the engineer employed on this canal, which was completed in 1797. It is 65 feet wide at top, 30 feet at bottom, and 15 feet deep; at the lowest neap tides there is a depth of 9 feet water at the gates of the lock, and at spring-tides, of 20 feet. A public swing bridge is erected over the canal at Hammerside.

This canal has fully answered the purposes for which it was undertaken, and is of great benefit to the town of Ulverstone, being most convenient for the iron works established in its neighbourhood.

URE RIVER.

7 George III. Cap. 93, Royal Assent 15th April, 1767.

1 George IV. Cap. 35, Royal Assent 23rd June, 1820.

THE portion of the River Ure made navigable under authority of the above acts of parliament, is that which, commencing at its junction with the Swale, and running in a westerly course, passing Boroughbridge and Newby Hall, terminates at Ripon.

The act of 1767, entitled, 'An Act for making navigable the River Ure from its Junction with the River Swale, to the borough of Ripon, in the county of York,' appoints certain commissioners to carry into effect the purposes of the act, with powers to borrow such sums of money as they may find necessary for completing the undertaking, upon the credit of the tolls, and to take the following tonnage rates.

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TONNAGE RATES.

For all Coal, Cinders and Lime (Thirty-two Bushels) 1s 6d per Chaldron.
For all Bricks, Tiles, Stone, Slate, Turf and Wood for Fire 1s 6d per Ton.
For all Butter, Timber, Marble and other Goods, Wares and Merchandize 3s 0d ditto.

The act of parliament passed in 1820, entitled, 'An Act for maintaining navigable the River Ure, and its collateral Cuts, from its Junction with the River Swale, to the borough of Ripon, in the county of York,' states that the commissioners appointed under the former act had greatly improved the navigation of the river, and had made several short cuts connected therewith, and had borrowed several sums of money to enable them to make such improvements, and that such sums, with the interest thereon, now amount to £27,850; and that none of the commissioners now remaining are qualified to act, and that the navigation is falling into decay, certain of the creditors of the navigation are, at their desire, incorporated by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the River Ure Navigation to Ripon," and empowered to raise amongst themselves, for the purposes of the act, the sum of £34,000, in two hundred shares of £170 each, and, if necessary, a further sum of £3,400, either amongst themselves, by the creation of new shares, or by mortgage of the tolls; and one hundred and sixty-four of the shares in this navigation are to be reserved for the holders of securities on the navigation, who may take them or remain creditors of the undertaking, at their option. The act also, as heretofore, authorizes the company to take the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Coal, Cinders and Lime (Thirty-two Bushels a Chaldron) 1s 6d per Chaldron.
For all Bricks, Tiles, Stone, Slate, Turf and Wood for Fire 1s 6d per Ton.
For all Butter, Timber, Marble and other Goods, Wares and Merchandize 3s 0d ditto.

And in proportion for a greater or less Quantity.

Vessels not passing a Lock on the Navigation, to pay no Tolls.

Goods remaining on Wharfs longer than Twenty-four Hours and less than Six Days, to pay Three-pence per Ton,and longer than Six Days, such Rate as may be agreed on.

The act also directs that the company expend £3,000 in repairs of the navigation within five years from the passing of the same.

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From Boroughbridge to Ripon are four locks, called Milby Lock, Rhodes's Field Lock, Oxclose Lock and Bell Furrows' Lock. Mr. John Smith was the engineer employed on this work.

The length of this navigation is about eight miles and a half, and its principal object the supply of Boroughbridge, Ripon, and their neighbourhood, with coal and other necessary articles of consumption; as well as the export of their agricultural products and large quantities of lead, which are carried to Hull by means of its connection with the River Ouse.

As that part of the River Ure below the junction with the Swale has been described in the account of the Ouse River, we refer our readers to that article.

USK TRAMROAD.

54 George III. Cap. 101, Royal Assent 17th June, 1814.

THE act of parliament relating to this tramroad is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Tramroad or Railway from the parish of Mamhilad, in the county of Monmouth, to or near Usk Bridge, in the said county.' It incorporates the company of proprietors by the name of "The Usk Tramroad Company," and empowers them to raise amongst themselves, for the purposes of the act, the sum of £6,000, in shares of £50 each, and, if necessary, a further sum of £3,000 either amongst themselves or by the creation of new shares, and to take the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Coal 3d per Ton, per Mile.
For all Dung, Compost, Lime-stone and all Sorts of Manure and Materials for repairing Roads 2d ditto. ditto.
For all Lime, Chalk, Marl, Ashes, Peat, Clay. Bricks and Sand 3d ditto. ditto.
For all Cinders, Coke, Culm and Charcoal, Tin, Copper, Lead-ore, Lead in Pigs or Sheets, Iron-stone or Ore, Iron in Pigs, Bar-iron, Tiles, Slates, Flag-stone and other Stone 4d ditto. ditto.
For all Timber and other Goods, Wares and Merchandize 6d ditto. ditto.

Fractions of a Quarter of a Ton or of a Mile to be taken as a Quarter.

The company are also authorized to receive the following tolls.

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TOLLS.

For every Horse, Mare, Gelding, Colt, Mule, Ass or other Beast, (not carrying or drawing any Goods which are liable to a Tonnage Rate) passing through any Toll Gate on the Tramroad 0s 3d each.
For all Cows, and Homed or Neat Cattle (except Sheep and Swine) 0s 1d ditto.
For all Swine and Sheep 1s 0d per Score.
For all Waggons and Carriages, carrying Persons for Hire, for each Passenger 0s 1d per Mile.

The act provides that £6,000 shall be subscribed before the work is commenced, and the railway to be completed in three years.

The situation and other description of this railway will be found under the article "Mamhilad Railway," in this work.

WARRINGTON AND NEWTON RAILWAY.

10 George IV. Cap. 37, Royal Assent 14th May, 1829.

11 George IV. Cap. 57, Royal Assent 29th May, 1830.

IN the year 1829 several landed gentlemen and others interested in the trade of the town of Warrington and its neighbourhood, obtained an act for a railway or tramroad, to join the Liverpool and Manchester Railway then in a course of execution, and thereby to afford an easier conveyance than heretofore for the import and export of goods to and from Warrington and the adjacent places. This act is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway or Tramroad from the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, at or near Wargrave Lane, in Newton-in Mackerfield, to Warrington, in the county palatine of Lancaster, and Two collateral Branches to communicate therewith.'

By this act the proprietors are incorporated as "The Warrington and Newton Railway Company," with powers to execute the proposed work, and to enter lands, take materials, and have all other privileges granted on similar occasions. They may also construct bridges, tunnels, inclined planes, warehouses, wharfs and all other necessary buildings, including steam engines, none of which, however, are to be used without consuming their own smoke. The road is not to pass nearer than twenty yards from the Sankey Brook Canal, which canal the company is not to obstruct under penalties to be enforced by any two justices of the

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peace for the county. The company may also purchase land for wharfs and warehouses on the line, to the extent of ten acres. For putting this act into execution, they are empowered to raise £53,000, in shares of £100 each; and in case this sum should not prove sufficient for the completion of the work, they may borrow £20,000 additional on mortgage, paying interest half yearly. By this act the following are to be demanded as

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Lime, Dung, Earth, Compost and all Sorts of Manure and Materials fur Roads, drawn or propelled and carried by and at the Expense of the said company 2d per Ton, per Mile.
For ditto onty drawn or propelled by the Company 1¾d ditto. ditto.
For ditto drawn or propelled and carried by other Persons 1½d ditto. ditto.
For all Coal, Coke, Culm, Charcoal, Cinders, Stone, Marl, Sand, clay, Building, Pitching and Paving-stones, Flags, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Lime, Earth, Staves, Deals, Lead and Iron in Pigs, or other Metals, drawn or propelled and carried by the company 3d ditto. ditto.
For ditto only drawn or propelled by ditto 2½d ditto. ditto.
For ditto drawn or propetled and carried by others 2d ditto. ditto.
For all Timber, Cotton, Wool, Hides, Drugs, Dye-woods, Sugar, Corn, Grain, Flour, Manufactured Goods, Lead in Sheets, Iron in Bars, and all other Goods, Wares and Merchandize, drawn or propelled and carried by the Company 4d ditto. ditto.
For ditto drawn or propelled by ditto 3½d ditto. ditto.
For ditto drawn or propelled and carried by others 3d ditto. ditto.
For all other Goods, Wares, and Carriages for conveying Passengers or Cattle which shall pass any Inclined Plane, the Owners shall pay in addition to the above Rates, for every Inclined Plane thus passed over 6d ditto.
For all Persons conveyed in Carriages drawn or propelled, and provided by the Company 3d each. ditto.
For ditto not provided by ditto 2½d ditto. ditto.
For every Horse, Mule, Ass or other Beast of Draught or Burthen, carried in Carriages drawn or propelled and provided by the Company 3d ditto. ditto.
For ditto not provided by ditto 2d ditto. ditto.
For every Calf, Sheep, Lamb or Pig, carried in Carriages provided and drawn or propelled by the Company 1d ditto. ditto.
For ditto not provided by ditto ½d ditto. ditto.

Fractions of a Ton and a Mile to be paid for as the Quarters therein, and of a Quarter as a Quarter.

Carriages and Cattle employed in conveying Materials for Roads and Highways in the Township of Winwirk-with-Hulme, or Hay, Straw, Corn in the Straw, Potatoes or other Produce of Land passing to the Barns or Lands of the Owners in the said Township, and other Things used in the said Township, or by the Rector thereof or his Tenants, are exempted from Tolls, provided they are not conveyed in the carriages or by the cattle of the Company.

The company may lower the said rates and raise the same again to the amount above quoted; they may also lease to the owners of mines on the line, the tolls of coals, &c. from their own mines, and they may generally let to farm, the tolls.

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Small parcels not exceeding five hundred pounds in weight are to be charged according to rates to be deterrnined by the company. The act also empowers them to charge the following

WHARFAGE, WAREHOUSING AND CRANAGE RATES.

For all Coals, Culm, Lime-stone and other Minerals, Timber, Stone, Clay, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Goods, Merchandise or other Things, landed on the Company's Wharfs and not continuing thereon more than Seventy-two Hours 0s 1d per Ton.
For ditto above that Time in addition for Wharfage, for the first Week 0s 1d ditto.
For ditto for Warehousing, for the first Week 0s 6d ditto.

And for every succeeding Week the same Sums respectively for Wharfage and Warehousing.
For Cranage of any Weight not exceeding Two Tons at one Lift 0s 6d per Ton.
For Cranage of Two Tons and less than Three Tons at one Lift 1s 0d ditto.
For Cranage of three Tons and less than Four Tons at one Lift 1s 6d ditto.

And so on, advancing Sixpence per Ton on each additional Weight of One Ton, raised at one single Lift.

If the railway shall cross the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, the same shall be made under the direction of that company's engineer, and the engines of this company shall by no means interrupt those of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway; and if the Sankey Brook Canal Company shall, under the powers of their own act, determine on making a canal from their present works to Warrington, so as to cross this railway, either under or over, the point and mode of such crossing shall be determined by two engineers appointed, one by each company, whose opinion shall, if necessary, be subject to the decision of a third engineer, appointed umpire between them.

This railway commences on the south side of the railway between Liverpool and Manchester, at Wargrave Lane, in Newton-within-Mackerfield, in the county palatine of Lancaster, and proceeds to Dallum Lane, in Warrington; with a collateral branch, commencing at the intersection of Jockey Lane and Dallum Lane in Warrington, to Cockhedge Field, in the said township of Warrington; and a second collateral branch commencing at the said intersection of Jockey Lane and Dallurn Lane, and terminating on the north side of the turnpike-road from Liverpool to Warrington, opposite Bankey or Bank Quay, all in the said county palatine of Lancaster. The length of the main line is about four miles and a quarter, and of the two branches little more than a mile. The line proceeds from Warrington, and is directly north, to Newton.

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The act of the 11th George IV. was obtained for the purpose of enabling the proprietors to make a branch from the main line of their railway, where it crosses Newton Brook, to the north side of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, near Newton Parks, so as to unite with the branch railway intended to be made from the borough of Wigan, where it joins the Liverpool and Manchester Railway.

The branch is one mile and a half in length, with a rise to the Liverpool and Manchester Railway of 49 feet 2 inches, at a point 56 feet 4 inches above the level of the bottom of the plinth course of Newton Viaduct. A deviation line of forty-two chains in length to the above-mentioned viaduct was contemplated, but subsequently abandoned.

Mr. Robert Stephenson is the engineer for this railway, and has estimated the expense of its construction at £7,008, which is to be advanced out of the funds of the original company; the power is here given them to borrow the further sum of £20,000 on mortgage of the undertaking.

The proprietors have taken the opportunity, afforded by the introduction of this bill, to obtain the repeal of a clause in the former act of 10th George IV. by which they were restrained from using locomotive engines on the estates of Thomas Lord Lilford and the Rector of Winwick, in the townships of Burtonwood and Winwick; and this is permitted in consequence of these gentlemen having been satisfied, from recent experiments, that no nuisance or annoyance can arise from their use.

By effecting a junction with the proposed Wigan Branch Railway, a direct communication will be made between the Wigan Great Coal Field and the populous town of Warrington; and it will afford a more expeditious transit for merchandize of every description into the populous districts on the line of this railway.

The work is as likely to answer the expectations of the proprietors as any speculation, of a similar description, lately entered upon.

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WARWICK AND BIRMINGHAM CANAL.

33 George III. Cap. 38, Royal Assent 6th March, 1793.

36 George III. Cap. 42, Royal Assent 24th March, 1796.

THIS canal commences at Saltisford, in the borough of Warwick, and from thence runs in a north-westerly direction, passing Budbrook and Bowington, to Kingswood, where it is joined by the Lapworth Branch of the Stratford-upon-Avon Canal; it then pursues a northerly course, passing by Knowle and Henwood Hall to Henwood Wharf, where it again turns off to the north-west, and passing by Olton End and Kingsford, and crossing a small part of Worcestershire, near Yardley, it joins the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham Canal at the town of Birmingham.

The act of parliament authorizing this undertaking was passed in 1793, and is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from, or nearly from., a Place called The Saltisford, in the parish of Saint Mary, in the borough of Warwick, unto or near to the parish of Birmingham, in the county of Warwick, and to terminate at or near to a certain navigable Canal in or near to the town of Birmingham, called the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham and Birmingham and Fazeley Canal Navigations.' It incorporates the subscribers by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Warwick and Birmingham Canal Navigation," and empowers them to raise amongst themselves, for the purposes of the act, time sum of £100,000, in one thousand shares of £100 each, and if necessary, a further sum of £30,000, and to take the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Coal, Stone, Iron, Timber and other Goods, conveyed less than Six Miles and passing any Lock 1s 0d per Ton.
For Six Miles and not exceeding Twelve 0s 2d ditto, per Mile.
For Twelve Miles and not exceeding Sixteen, and not passing through the Uppermost Lock at each End of the Upper Summit 2s 0d ditto.
For Sixteen Miles and Upwards, and not passing the said Locks 0s 1½d ditto. ditto.
For passing either of the said Locks 2s 3d ditto.
For passing from Birmingham towards Warwick, and passing the Upper Lock below Hatton Hill 2s 9d ditto.
For any Distance less than a Mile, and not passing a Lock 0s 2d ditto.
For One Mile and less than Six, and not passing any Lock 0s 2d ditto. ditto.

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And in proportion for greater or less Quantities.

Lime and Lime-stone are to pay Two-thirds of the above Rates only.

Paving-stones, Gravel, Sand and other Materials for Roads; and Dung, Soil and other Manure (except Lime and Lime-stone) for the Grounds of Persons whose Lands have been taken for the Canal, and provided they do not pass any Lock unless the Water shall flow over the Waste Weir, are exempted from these Rates.

Wharfage on Goods remaining more than Twenty-four Hours, is to be such Sum as the Parties may agree on.

The act grants to the Birmingham Canal Company certain tonnages for the permission to join their canal, which will be found under the head of the "Birmingham Canal Navigations," in this work.

The act of parliament obtained by the Stratford-upon-Avon Canal Company, to connect their canal with the Warwick and Birmingham Canal, by the Lapworth Cut, also directs certain rates to be paid by them to the proprietors of the Warwick and Birmingham Canal, which will be found in the account of the Stratford-upon-Avon Canal, as the clause is contained in that canal act.

The length of this canal is twenty-two miles and a half; the first half mile from its commencement at Saltisford, to near Budbrook, is level; thence to Hatton, two miles and a half, is a rise of 146 feet by twenty locks; thence to the Stratford Branch, about four miles, is level; thence to Knowle Common, about four miles and a quarter, is level; thence to Knowle Wharf, a quarter of a mile, is a rise of 42 feet by seven locks; thence to near Deritend, about ten miles, is level; and thence to the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham Canal, about a mile, is a fall of 42 feet by five locks. At the termination at Digbeth a stop-lock is erected, which the Birmingham and Fazeley Company may fasten up, whenever the water in this canal is of less depth than 4 feet at this lock.

At Haseley this canal passes through a tunnel of three hundred yards in length; and there is another tunnel at Rowington; at Henwood Wharf it crosses the Blythe River, by an aqueduct; near Flint Green it passes over the Cole River in the same manner; and there is a third aqueduct over the Rea River near its termination at Digbeth.

A second act of parliament was obtained by this company in 1796, entitled, 'An Act for enabling the Company of Proprietors of the Warwick and Birmingham Canal Navigation, to finish

page 657

'and complete the same; and for amending the Act of Parliament passed in the Thirty-third Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, for making the said Canal,' which empowers the company to raise a further sum of £50,000 to carry on their work, by a creation of one thousand half shares of £50 each.

This canal is one of the great lines of communication between Lancashire and London; by its connection with the Oxford Canal, through the Warwick and Napton, and thence with the Grand Junction Canal, near Braunston, it not only opens a communication between London and Birmingham and the neighbouring commercial towns, but is a means, by its other connections, of conveying the trade between London, Liverpool and Manchester; in addition to which, it affords a cheap and plentiful supply of coal to Warwick, Leamington and the neighbourhood, and therefore cannot fail to remunerate the proprietors.

WARWICK AND NAPTON CANAL.

34 George III. Cap. 38, Royat Assent 28th March, 1794.

36 George III. Cap. 95, Royal Assent 14th May, 1796.

49 George III. Cap. 72, Royal Assent 20th May, 1809.

THIS canal, commencing at the Warwick and Birmingham Canal, in the parish of Budbrook, runs in an easterly direction, leaving the city of Warwick on the south, and passing by Leamington Prior's, Radford, Long Itchington and Stockton, it joins the Oxford Canal near Napton-on-the-Hill. In its course, which is about fourteen miles in length, it crosses the River Avon near Warwick by an aqueduct bridge, and near Radford and Long Itchington there are other smaller aqueducts.

The first act of parliament relating to this canal was passed in 1794, and entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal, out of, and from, the Warwick and Birmingham Canal now cutting, or intended to be cut, in the parish of Budbrook, in the county of Warwick, into the Oxford Canal, in the parish of Braunston, in time county of Northampton.' It incorporates the subscribers to the undertaking, by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Warwick and Braunston Canal

page 658

"Navigation," and empowers them to raise amongst themselves, for the purposes of the act, the sum of £100,000, in one thousand shares of £100 each, and if necessary, a further sum of £30,000.

The course prescribed by this act was soon found to be inconvenient, the company of proprietors therefore obtained a second act of parliament in 1796, entitled, 'An Act for authorizing the Company of Proprietors of time Warwick and Braunston Canal Navigation to vary the Course of a certain Part of the said Canal, and for amending and altering the Act made in the Thirty-fourth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty for making the said Canal,' which authorized them to adopt the present line of the canal, and change the name of the company to that of "The Company of Proprietors of the Warwick and Napton Navigation ;" and to take the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Coal and other Goods navigated less than Six Miles, and passing any Lock or Locks 1s 0d per Ton.
From Six and not exceeding Eight Miles 0s 2d ditto, per Mile.
From Eight and not exceeding Thirteen Miles, for the first Eight Miles 0s 2d ditto. ditto.
After the Eighth Mile 0s 1d ditto. ditto.
For all Coal or other Goods navigated along the whole of the Canal or any part thereof more than Thirteen Miles 0s 1½d ditto. ditto.
If such Goods do not pass a Lock 0s 1½d ditto. ditto.

Lime and Lime-stone only half the said Tonnage.

Fractions of a Mile to be taken as a Mile, and of a Quarter of a Ton as a Quarter.

Only Two-pence per Ton per Mile to be taken on Goods carried on this Canal, not exceeding Five Miles from the Warwick and Birmingham Navigation; nor more than Three Half-pence per Ton per Mile for Free-stone, nor any Tonnage on empty Boats passing for the purpose of fetching Free-stone, or Boats laden with Manure for the Lands of Persons whose Ground has been taken for the Canal.

The first act of parliament contained certain clauses of tonnage rates in favour of the Oxford Canal Company, which by this act are repealed, and in lieu thereof, it is enacted :-

"That time proprietors of the Oxford Canal shall receive, over and above the rate of tonnage they are entitled to, on coal, goods, &c. passing on their canal by virtue of any act now in force, the following

RATES.

For all Coals navigated out of this Canal into the Oxford Canal (except such as shall be navigated into the Grand Junction Canal) 3s 4d per Ton.
For all Goods navigated out of this Canal into the Oxford Canal, or out of the Oxford into this Canal, except such as shall be navigated into or out of the Grand Junction Canal, or from the Coventry Canal, or from any intermediate Place between the said Coventry Canal and this Canal, and also except Lime, Lime-stone and Manure 5s 2½d ditto.

page 659

RATES CONTINUED.

For all Coal navigated out of this Canal into the Oxford Canal, and along the same into the Grand Junction canal 2s 9d per Ton.
For all Goods (except Coal, Lime, Lime-stone, and Manure) navigated out of this Canal into the Oxford Canal, and along the same into the Grand Junction Canal, or out of the Grand Junction Canal, into the Oxford Canal, and along the same into this Canal 4s 4d ditto.

Coal navigated out of this Canal into the Oxford Canal towards Braunston, and laid down on the Banks of such Canal and not carried into the Grand Junction Canal, the usual Tonnage over and above the said Two Shillings and Nine-pence per Ton.

Goods (except Coal, Lime, Lime-stone and Manure) navigated out of this Canal into the Oxford Canal, and along the same towards Braunston, and laid down on the Banks of the said Oxford Canal, and not carried on the Grand Junction Canal, or from any Place on the Oxford Canal, between Braunston and Napton, along the Oxford Canal into this Canal, the usual Tonnage payable for such Goods, Wares and Merchandize (except as aforesaid) on such Canal, over and above the said Four Shillings and Four-pence per Ton.
Lime and Lime-stone navigated out of this Canal into the Oxford Canal, and whether along the same into the Grand Junction Canal or not 0s 6d per Ton.

This canal is upon the same level with the Warwick and Birmingham Canal at their junction at Budbrook, and is entitled to the waste water of that canal; but from thence to its junction with the Oxford Canal it rises 134¼ feet.

The last act of parliament obtained by this company was passed in 1809, and is entitled, 'An Act for amending, altering and enlarging the Powers of the several Acts relating to the Warwick and Napton Canal Navigation.' Its principal clause is explaining one in a former act, respecting vessels under twenty tons passing any of the locks, and providing that such vessels may pass them at all times on paying for twenty tons.

By executing this short canal from Warwick to Napton, another and a shorter line of communication is opened between London and Birmingham; besides affording a more direct conveyance for coal to supply the demands of the country connected with the Oxford and Grand Junction Canals, and the River Thames, to the great advantage of many large towns, as well as to the trade carried on between London and Birmingham.

page 660

WEALD OF KENT CANAL.

52 George III. Cap. 70, Royal Assent 5th May, 1812.

THE act of parliament under sanction of which it was proposed to carry this work into execution, is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from the River Medway, near Brandbridges, in the parish of East Peckham, in the county of Kent, to extend to, and unite with, the Royal Military Canal, in the parish of Appledore, in the said county; and also certain navigable Branches and Railways from the said intended Canal.' It incorporates the subscribers by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Weald of Kent Canal," and empowers them to raise amongst themselves, for the purposes of the act, the sum of £320,000, in shares of £100 each, of which sum, £305,800 is to be raised before the work is commenced, and three years is given to them to get this amount of subscription, which nmust be proved to have been done at the general quarter sessions. The company may raise a further sum of £160,000, if necessary, either amongst themselves, by creation of new shares, or by mortgage of the rates, and also take the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Chalk, Lime, Marl, Dung, Compost or Manure, which shall pass any Lock 1½d per Ton, per Mile.
If not passing through a Lock 1d ditto. ditto.
For all Coal, Culm and Coke 2d ditto. ditto.
For all Sea Beach or Shingle 1d ditto. ditto.
For all Timber and all other Goods, Wares and Merchandise, passing through any Lock 3d ditto. ditto.
If not passing through a Lock 2d ditto. ditto.

And in proportion for any greater or less Quantity or Distance; but Fractions of a Quarter in both cases to be taken as a Quarter.

The company are also authorized to take the following tolls for passing on the towing-path.

TOLLS.

For every Horse, Mule or Ass (not drawing a Vessel) passing through any Toll Gate 1d each.
For every Drove of Oxen or Neat Cattle 10d per Score.
For every Drove of Swine, Sheep or Lambs 5d ditto.

Vessels in Ballast only or light, to pay Three-pence per Ton per Mile; and all Vessels entering any Basins or Harbours, to pay Three-pence per Ton if they have not passed Ten Miles on the Canal.

page 661

Lords of manors or land-owners may erect wharfs, and take the following

RATES.

For all Coal, Lime, Stone, Clay, Iron, Iron-stone, Lead or any other Ore, Timber, Stone, Bricks, Tiles, Slate, Gravel, Hay, Straw, Corn in the Straw or Manure, for the first Month 1d per Ton.
For all other Goods, Wares and Merchandize, for Fourteen Days 2d ditto.

The act enables the company to make the canal from the River Medway at Brandbridges, through East Peckham, Yalding, Nettlestead, Brenchley, Horsmonden, Goudhurst, Marden, Staplehurst, Cranbrook, Trittenden, Biddenden, Strend Quarter, Holden, Middle Quarter, Tenterden, Ebony and Appledore, there to unite with the Royal Military Canal; also a collateral branch from Middle Quarter to Wye, in the county of Kent, with railways therefrom; and another collateral cut from Goudhurst to Hope Mill; and furthermore to make reservoirs and feeders for supplying the same with water.

This canal would open a communication from the River Thames at Gravesend, by the Thames and Medway Canal, and the River Medway, and by its junction with the Royal Military Canal, to all the places on the coast between Hythe and Winchelsea; thus avoiding the boisterous navigation round the North and South Forelands, as will be seen by reference to our map; but it has not been executed, and probably this delay arises from the restrictive clause which required a large sum to be raised before the work commenced.

WEAR RIVER.

3 Geo. I. C. - R. A. - - - - - 1716.

13 Geo. I. C. 6, R. A. 24th March, 1726.

20 Geo. II. C. 18, R. A. 17th June, 1747.

32 Geo. II. C. 64, R. A. 2nd June, 1759.

32 Geo. II. C. 65, R. A. 2nd June, 1759.

25 Geo. III. C. 26, R. A. - - - - 1785.

49 Geo. III. C. 41, R. A. 12th May, 1809.

59 Geo. III. C. 106, R. A. 21st June, 1819.

11 Geo. IV. C. 49, R. A. 29th May, 1830.

THIS river is navigable from its mouth to within a short distance of the city of Durham, whence it runs in a northerly direction, passing Finchale Abbey, and Lumley Castle, to Lambton Hall, and from thence turning to the north-east, it empties itself into the sea at Sunderland, being a distance of about eighteen miles.

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