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This Book "Priestley's Navigable Rivers and Canals" by Joseph Priestley was previously published in April 1831. NOTE: Oringinally called "Historical Account of the Navigable Rivers, Canals, and Railways, of Great Britain".
For more information see About this Book

Index Page Link to Previous Page 521

page 522 and page 523

POCKLINGTON CANAL TONNAGE RATES.

DESCRIPTION OF GOODS(A)(B)(C)(D)(E)(F) (G)(H) (I) (J) (K) (L) (M) (N) (O) (P) (Q) (R) (S) (T)
For every Quarter of Wheat, Barley, Beans, Rye, Mastlin, Peas, Vetches, Linseed, Mustard and Rapeseed1s 2d.1s 2d.0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d. 0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d.0s 8d.0s 4d.0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d. 0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d.0s 8d.0s 4d.
For every Quarter it Oats and Malt1s 0d.1s 0d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 9d.0s 3d. 0s 6d.0s 9d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 3d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 9d. 0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 9d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 3d.
For every Bag of Flour, or Shelling, Pearl Barley, Nuts, Clover, and all other heavy Seeds0s 9d.0s 9d.0s 4d.0s 6d.0s 8d.0s 4d. 0s 6d.0s 8d.0s 4d.0s 6d.0s 4d.0s 4d.0s 6d.0s 8d. 0s 4d.0s 6d.0s 8d.0s 4d.0s 6d.0s 4d.
For every Chaldron of Lime for Manure1s 6d.1s 6d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 4d.1s 0d. ls 2d.1s 4d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 0d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 4d. 1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 4d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 0d.
For every Waggon of Coals, Slack and Cinders6s 8d.6s 8d.2s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.2s 0d. 4s 0d.6s 0d.2s 0d.4s 0d.2s 0d.2s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d. 2s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.2s 0d.4s 0d.2s 0d.
For every Ton of Household Furniture9s 0d.9s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.8s 0d.4s 0d. 6s 0d.8s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.4s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.8s 0d. 4s 0d.6s 0d.8s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.4s 0d.
For Bacon Cheese Hemp, Flax, Lard, Madder and Tow, per Ton5s 6d.5s 6d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d. 4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d. 3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.
For every Ton of Brass, Copper, Currants, Nails, Pelts wet, Salt, Shot, Pots, Soap, Sugar and Treacle7s 6d.7s 6d.5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d. 6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.5s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d. 5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.5s 0d.
For every Ton of Iron, Pig and Bar Lead, Pig and Sheet5s 6d.5s 6d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d. 4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d. 3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.
For every Ton of Boxes, Cloth, Coffee, Dying Woods, Dry Goods, Fruit in Chests or Boxes, Glass, Groceries, Hides, Hops, Paint, Parcels, Pitch, Rice, Saltpetre, Spirits, Starch, Sumach, Tar, Tea, Tin, Tobacco, Turpentine, Wines, Welds and Yarn 8s 0d.8s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d. 6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.5s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d. 5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.5s 0d.
For every Ton of Oak, Ash and Elm Timber, Forty Feet; Fir Timber, Fifty Feet; Battens, Deals and Pipe Staves6s 8d.6s 8d.2s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.2s 0d. 4s 0d.6s 0d.2s 0d.4s 0d.2s 0d.2s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d. 2s 0d.4s 0d.6s 0d.2s 0d.4s 0d.2s 0d.
For every Ton of Manure, Gravel and Sand1s 6d.1s 6d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 4d.1s 0d. ls 2d.1s 4d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 0d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 4d. 1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 4d.1s 0d.1s 2d.1s 0d.
For every Quarter Roke of Apples, Onions, Pears, Potatoes, Carrots and Turnips1s 2d.1s 2d.0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d. 0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d.0s 8d.0s 4d.0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d. 0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d.0s 8d.0s 4d.
For every Thousand if Bricks3s 0d.3s 0d.1s 6d.2s 0d.2s 6d.1s 6d. 0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d.0s 8d.0s 4d.0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d. 0s 4d.0s 8d.1s 0d.0s 4d.0s 8d.0s 4d.
For every Thousand of Tiles3s 6d.3s 6d.1s 9d.2s 3d.2s 9d.1s 9d. 2s 3d.2s 9d.1s 9d.2s 3d.1s 9d.1s 9d.2s 3d.2s 9d. 1s 9d.2s 3d.2s 9d.1s 9d.2s 3d.1s 9d.
For Hay and other light Seeds, Mill Dust and Bran, per Quarter1s 0d.1s 0d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 9d.0s 3d. 0s 6d.0s 9d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 3d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 9d. 0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 9d.0s 3d.0s 6d.0s 3d.
For every Firkin of Butter0s 3d.0s 3d.0s 1½d.0s 2d.0s 2½d.0s 1½d. 0s 2d.0s 2½d.0s 1½d.0s 2d.0s 1½d.0s 1½d.0s 2d.0s 2½d. 0s 1½d.0s 2d.0s 2½d.0s 1½d.0s 2d.0s 1½d.
For every Ton of Bones, Cobbles for paving, and Horns5s 6d.5s 6d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d. 4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d. 3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.
For every Ton of Alum, Copperas, Fish, Grease, Iron manufactured, Lead ditto, Tallow and Woad7s 6d.7s 6d.5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d. 6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.5s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d. 5s 0d.6s 0d.7s 0d.5s 0d.6s 0d.5s 0d.
For Chalk, Flags, Flints, Fuller's-earth, Kelp, Ling, Oil Cake, Plaster, Rugs, Ropes, Slate, Stone and Whitting per Ton5s 6d.5s 6d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d. 4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d. 3s 0d.4s 0d.5s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.3s 0d.
For every Ton of Rape Dust, Ashes, Soot and Whale Blubber4s 6d.4s 6d.2s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d..2s 0d 3s 0d.4s 0d.2s 0d.3s 0d.2s 0d.2s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d. 2s 0d.3s 0d.4s 0d.2s 0d.3s 0d.2s 0d.
For every Bundle of Laths and Willows0s 2½d.0s 2½d.0s 1d.0s 1½d.0s 2d.0s 1d. 0s 1½d. 0s 2d.0s 1d.0s 1½d.0s 1d.0s 1d.0s 1½d.0s 2d. 0s 1d.0s 1½d.0s 2d.0s 1d.0s 1½d.0s 1d .
For every Pack, Three Hundred and Twelve Pounds, of Dried Pelts, Spetches, and Wool0s 10d.0s 10d.0s 5d.0s 7d.0s 9d.0s 5d. 0s 7d.0s 9d.0s 5d.0s 7d.0s 5d.0s 5d.0s 7s.0s 9d. 0s 5d.0s 7d.0s 9d.0s 5d.0s 7d.0s 5d.
For every Chaldron of Lime for Building and other Uses2s 0d.2s 0d.1s 0d..1s 5d1s 10d.1s 0d. 1s 5d.1s 10d.1s 0d.1s 5d.1s 0d.1s 0d.1s 5d.1s 10d. 1s 0d.1s 5d.1s 10d.1s 0d.1s 5d.1s 0d.
For every Chaldron of Bark2s 3d.2s 3d.1s 4d.1s 8d.2s 0d.1s 4d. 1s 8d.2s 0d.1s 4d.1s 8d.1s 4d.1s 4d.1s 8d.2s 0d. 1s 4d.1s 8d.2s 0d.1s 4d.1s 8d.1s 4d.

page 524

They may also erect wharfs, warehouses and quays, for the use of which, if goods remain above twenty-four hours, a further rate may be charged at the discretion of the proprietors.

This work commences in the River Derwent at East Cottingwith, not far from Thickit Hall, and running alongside the Pocklington Brook, proceeds for a short distance eastwards, then bending northward by Storthwaite, it takes an easterly course, leaving Melbourn Lodge and Melbourn on the south, till it reaches Beilby, where it turns at a right angle to the north, in which direction it proceeds to Street Bridge, where it terminates at the wharf adjacent to the turnpike-road leading from York to Market Weighton; having traversed a distance of about eight miles and a half, with only four locks.

There is one peculiarity in the execution of this canal, which deserves notice, that the engineer, Mr. George Leather, completed it for a less sum than the original estimate.

The chief objects in making this canal were to obtain coal, and lime for manure to Pocklington and its vicinity, and in return to convey the corn of the neighbourhood to the manufacturing districts; these are fully answered and the concern is likely to pay the adventurers.

POLBROCK CANAL.

37 George III. Cap. 52, Royal Assent 3rd March, 1797.

THOUGH many years have elapsed since the projection of this canal, it will be seen that it has not yet been executed. The act obtained for its completion is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from Guinea Port, in time parish of Saint Breock, in the county of Cornwall, to Dunmur Bridge, in the parish of Bodmin, in the said county; and also a certain collateral Cut from Cotton Wood to or near to Ruthen Bridge, in the said parish of Bodmin.' By it the proprietors were incorporated as" The Company of Proprietors of the Polbrock Canal," with the power of raising £18,000, in shares of £50 each. The work was projected, under the superintendence of Mr. John

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Rennie and Mr. Murray, for supplying the town of Bodmin with coal, and for conveying minerals from the mines in its neighbourhood. Its direction would have been south-east for about five miles, at a small elevation above the sea, near the north-west coast of Cornwall. Not having been executed, it is unnecessary to quote the proposed tonnage rates.

POLLOC AND GOVAN RAILWAY.

11 George IV. Cap. 62, Royal Assent 29th May, 1830.

THIS railway commences from the River Clyde, at the south quay of the Broomielaw in the city of Glasgow, from whence it crosses the road leading from Paisley to the last-mentioned place, then crosses and runs parallel with the private railway leading from the Govan Colliery to Tradestown; and shortly afterwards it crosses, at right angles, the Glasgow, Paisley and Ardrossan Canal, near its termination at Port Eglinton; thence to Port Eglinton Street, where it terminates after forming a junction with the Govan Railway.

It is in length only one thousand four hundred and eighty-eight yards, with a total rise from the quay of 39 feet 5 inches. There is a branch to Sir John Maxwell's Estate, at Polloc, of three hundred and twelve yards in length, and another near its termination, to the Glasgow, Paisley and Ardrossan Canal, at Port Eglinton, of two hundred and eighty-nine yards in length. The line and branches were designed by Mr. Thomas Grainger, civil engineer, who estimated
The Main Line to cost£8,000
The Branch to the Canal 950
And the Branch to the Polloc Estate__750
Total£9,700

The act authorizing the making of this railway bears date the 29th May, 1830, and is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway from the Lands of Polloc and Govan, to the River Clyde, at the Harbour of Broomielaw, in the county of Lanark, with a Branch to commnnicate therefrom.' The sub-

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scribers, consisting of six persons, were incorporated as "The Polloc and Govan Railway Company," and empowered to raise amongst themselves the sum of £10,000 in four hundred shares of £25 each, and may borrow, if necessary, the further sum of £5,000 on assignment of the rates as a security.

TONNAGE RATES.

For Lime-stone, Dung, Compost, Manure and Materials for making or repairing of Roads 2d per Ton.
For Coal, Coke, Cannel or Gas Coal, Cuim, Charcoal, Cinders, Stone, Sand, Bricks, Slates, Lime, Earth, Iron, Lead or others Metals or Minerals Unmanufactured 3d ditto.
For Timber, Corn, Flour, Goods, Lead in Sheets, and all other Wares or Commodities 3d ditto.

For the use of any Waggon, Machinery, Engine or Power belonging to the Company, such additional Sum as they may from Time to Time require.

Fractions to be taken as for a Quarter of a Ton.

The chief object of this railway is to open a better communication between the river of Clyde and the Govan Colliery, and rich mineral estate of Sir John Maxwell, of Polloc, Bart. A further advantage will accrue to the inhabitants of Tradestown, by the conveniences to be constructed at the harbour of Broomielaw, for the shipping, unshipping and warehousing of every description of merchandize.

PORTLAND RAILWAY.

6 George IV. Cap. 121, Royal Assent 10th June, 1825.

THE act for forming this useful work was passed in the year 1825, and is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway or Tramroad in the parish of St. George, in the Island of Portland, in the county of Dorset;' by which act certain persons are incorporated as "The Portland Railway Company," with powers to make a railway from the Priory Lands in Portland Island, to the Stone Piers at Portland Castle; they are also to raise £5,000, in shares of £50 each, for the payment of expenses incurred in the execution of the same; and should the above prove insufficient, they may borrow £2,000 on mortgage of the works. They are authorized to demand the following tonnage rates.

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TONNAGE RATES.

For all Stone of the best Quality 8d per Ton, per Mile.
For all Roach Stone, Capping, Ashlars for Building, Lime-stone and all other inferior Stone, sold at Two-thirds of the Price of the best Portland Stone 6d ditto. ditto.
For all other Goods, Commodities, Wares and Merchandize 8d ditto. ditto.

Fractions of a Ton and of a Mile to be charged as the Quarters therein, and of a Quarter as a Quarter.

These rates the company may from time to time reduce and raise again as occasion may require.

This railroad is not to interfere with or impede the military defence of Portland Castle ; and no building is to be erected within two hundred yards of the said castle. If the work is not finished in three years, this act is to be void and of none effect, as far as regards the parts uncompleted. The length is two miles and four chains, and was designed by Mr. James Brown, civil engineer, who estimated the cost at £5,689, 12s.

PORTSMOUTH AND ARUNDEL CANAL.

57 George III. C. 63, R. A. 7th July, 1817.

59 George III. C. 104, R. A. 21st June, 1819.

2 George IV. C. 62, R. A. 28th May, 1821.

9 George IV. C. 57, R. A. 23rd May, 1828.

THIS canal commences from the tideway in the River Arun, at the village of Ford, three miles from the sea at Arundel Harbour, and two miles and three quarters from the town of Arundel, and proceeds westward close to the villages of Yapton, Barnham and Merston, to half a mile from North Mundham, where the Chichester Branch leaves; from thence it proceeds by Donnington to Chichester Harbour, where the principal line of canal terminates, being in length, from the River Arun, eleven miles, seven furlongs and eight chains. Upon this line are four locks. From the bed of the Arun to high water, spring tides, is 15 feet, and a lock of 5 feet above high-water-mark on the bank of the river; one furlong and one chain further on the canal is another lock of 7 feet; from this lock it is level ten miles, five furlongs and three chains, where there is a lock down 7 feet; and at the end of the canal, in Chichester Harbour, is another of 5 feet to high-water-mark, spring tides.

page 528

The estimate for this line is £72,270; and for the Chichester Branch, which is level and one mile, two furlongs and three chains in length, is £6,500. This canal and branch is supplied from Chichester Harbour with water, which is lifted by a steam engine at that end of the canal. The canal is according to section 33 feet at top, 19 feet 6 inches at bottom and 4 feet 6 inches deep. The channels from the end of the main line of canal in Chichester Harbour, round Thorney Island and Hayling Island by Thorney and Langstone Wadeways, and Langstone Harbour, to the end of the Portsea Canal, is thirteen miles and one furlong. The estimate for making these wadeways sufficiently deep is £12,914. The canal from Eastney Lake is two miles, three furlongs and two chains in length; there are two locks of 5 and 7 feet at the east end, and a basin at the teranination at Portsea. This part is 5 feet deep, and the estimate £18,618; it is supplied with water by an engine. The distance from the end of the main line of canal in Chichester Harbour to the canal at Cosham is fifteen miles and two furlongs, and the length of the canal to Porchester Lake in Portsmouth Harbour is one mile, two furlongs and four chains. This branch is 7 feet deep with two sea locks, one at each end of the canal of 10 feet rise each; the estimate £15,188. The total estimate is £125,490. The surveys were made by Messrs. Netlam and Francis Giles, of London; the estimate and execution of the works by the late Mr. Rennie.

By the first act, entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from the River Arun to Chichester Harbour, and from thence to Langstone and Portsmouth Harbours, with a Cut or Branch from Hunston Common to or near the city of Chichester, and for improving the Navigation of the Harbour of Langstone, and Channels of Langstone and Thorney,' the company is incorporated under the title of "The Company of Proprietors of the Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation," with power to make a canal from the Arun River, in the parish of Ford and county of Sussex, to Chichester Harbour, with a branch from the same at Hunston Common near Chichester to Southgate in the parish of St. Bartholomew, near the said city, together with another canal from Langstone Harbour to the harbour at Portsmouth; and to deepen and render navigable the channels of

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Thorney and Hayling, as well as the said harbour at Langstone; and another canal from the said harbour at Milton Common in Portsea, to the Halfway Houses in the same parish and county of Southampton. By this act the proprietors are empowered to raise £126,000, in shares of £50 each, and a further sum of £40,000, if required, on mortgage of the works.

After this first act had been obtained, it was judged expedient to make certain parts of the main line of the canal from the Arun to Chichester Harbour capable of being used by vessels of one hundred tons burthen, and that from Langstone Harbour to Halfway Houses for ships of one hundred and fifty tons, the completion of which works would be materially furthered by an agreement between this company and the proprietors of the Wey and Arun Navigation; it was therefore determined to apply to parliament for the requisite authority, and a second act was in consequence obtained in 1819, under title of 'An Act for giving further Powers to the Company of Proprietors of the Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation, and to the Company of Proprietors of the Wey and Arun Junction Canal, and to confirm an Agreement entered into between the said Companies.' By this act an agreement between the two companies, for mutual accommodation, was ratified, and the following adjudged, in lieu of former tolls, as the Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation Company's on the part of the main line leading from Hunston Common to Chichester, and on the branch from the same place to Southgate, and from Milton Common to the Halfway Houses.

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Dung, Chalk, Lime, Lime-stone, Marl and Manure 0s 3d per Ton, per Mile.0s 2d
For all Chalk, Marl, Lime, Lime-stone, except when used for Manure, and for all other Goods, Wares, Merchandize and Things 0s 6d ditto. ditto.0s 4d
For every Empty Boat, Barge or Vessel passing through any Lock on the said Canals, or either of them 1s 6d each per Lock .1s 6d
For every Passenger in the same, not employed as Navigators therein 0s 2d ditto per Mile.0s 2d
For every Package not exceeding Two Hundred Weight and addressed to different Persons 0s 1½d ditto. ditto.0s 1d

Wharfage Rates may also be demanded for Goods shipped or landed in the said Lines, viz. Four-pence per Ton for the first Ten Days, and Three Half-pence per Ton for every subsequent Day they remain.

Fractions of a Ton and of a Mile to be taken as the Quarters therein, and of a Quarter as a Quarter.

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TONNAGE RATES CONTINUED.

Naval Stores to be exempted from One-sixth of the Rates.

The Company are authorized to demand for all Vessels using Portsbridge Creek, the Tonnage Rates in the Second Column above.

King's Stores are free from the Rates of Portsbridge Creek, and Revenue Boats may enter the Canals Toll Free.

By this act also the agreement between this company and the Wey and Arun is confirmed, whereby the Wey and Arun Company consent to receive for all descriptions of goods conveyed from the port of Portsmouth through their canal into the River Thames, 4s. 6d. per ton, and in proportion for a greater or less quantity than a ton, in times of peace; but in war the rates secured to them by act of parliament, shall be demanded; the Portsmouth and Arundel Company also covenant for themselves that they will only charge 3d. per ton per mile, for all goods conveyed from the port of Portsmouth into and throughout the said Wey and Arun Junction Canal and vice versa, but will not extend the said benefit to any goods conveyed out of the Arun Navigation or the port of Arundel, into the said canals, or vice versa.

By this act also the Wey and Arun Junction have power to raise £10,000 for comnpleting tile necessary alterations, subject to the same regulations as the sum of £99,500 granted by their own private act. This money may, if expedient, be raised on mortgage of the works.

In 1821 another act was obtained as 'An Act for giving further Powers to the Company of Proprietors of the River Arun Navigation, and for confirming certain Agreements entered into between the said Company and the Company of Proprietors of the Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation.' This act recites and confirms two agreements made between the Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation and the Arun Company, whereby certain tolls are respectively to be received and paid by the said companies for goods passing on each respectively, but which it would not be interesting to our readers to quote particularly; it also empowers the Arun Company to complete their works and to receive on them, when finished, 1s. 6d. per ton for all goods, passing on and throughout the Arun Navigation and the Wey and Arun Navigation into the Wey, and vice versa; and 1s. per ton for all goods conveyed as

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before from or to the port of Arundel; and it confirms a power of the first act for enabling the Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation Company to borrow £40,000.

In 1828 a fourth act, entitled, 'An Act for granting further Powers to the Company of Proprietors of the Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation,' was obtained, whereby the company are empowered to raise an additional sum of £50,000, in £25 shares, each share being entitled for ten years to a dividend of £6 per cent. per annum, the surplus of profits, after paying this amount of dividend to the new subscribers, to be then divided amongst the original shareholders; and if the nett receipts will not pay the said dividend of £6 per cent. per annum to the said new subscribers, the deficiency shall be made up, before any dividend to the old subscribers is declared, and £5 per cent. after the ten years, is to be paid to the new subscribers in preference to the old. The money or any part of it, may be borrowed on mortgage of the works if more advisable.

This is a stupendous work, and from its connexion with others, as seen by the inspection of our map, opens a communication with almost every part of the kingdom; its utility, therefore, is self-evident. By the execution of it, military stores also may be transmitted inland from London to Portsmouth, which would avoid the risks that transports would otherwise incur in time of war, by the necessity of going through the straits of Dover and coastwise.

RAMSDEN'S (SIR JOHN) CANAL.

14 George Ill. Cap. 13, Royal Assent 9th March, 1774.

THIS canal commences at the River Calder near Cooper's Bridge, and thence runs in a south-westerly direction to the King's Mill, near the town of Huddersfield, in Yorkshire. It was executed under sanction of an act of parliament, entitled, 'An Act for enabling Sir John Ramsden, Baronet, to make and maintain a navigable Canal from the River Calder, between a Bridge called Cooper's Bridge, and the Mouth of the River Colne to the King's Mill, near the town of Huddersfleld, in the West Riding of the county of York,' and is about three miles and three quarters in length, with a rise of 57 feet 4 inches.

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This canal, although its length is so short, forms one of the links connecting the two seas, by its communication with the Calder at Cooper's Bridge, and with the Huddersfield Canal at Huddersfield; and has been the chief means of raising Huddersfield to one of the principal markets for woollen goods in the county of York.

The act of parliament empowers the proprietor to take 1s. 6d. per ton on all goods; and he having erected commodious warehouses at Huddersfield, which town is built upon his own estate, the trade there is accommodated upon moderate terms.

REDRUTH AND CHASEWATER RAILWAY.

5 George IV. Cap. 121, Royal Assent 17th June, 1824.

THE act for executing this work was obtained in 1824, under title of 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway or Tramroad from the town of Redruth, in the county of Cornwall, to Point Quay, in the parish of Feock, in the same county, with several Branches therefrom; and also for restoring, improving and maintaining the Navigation of Restrongett Creek, in the same county,' whereby certain persons, incorporated as" The Redruth and Chasewater Railway Company," have powers to complete the same, for which purpose they may raise £22,500, in shares of £100 each; and should such sum prove insufficient, they may obtain, in addition to the above, £10,000, either by the creation of new shares, or by subscription amongst themselves. For paying the interest of monies advanced and other contingent expenses, they are authorized to collect the following

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Sand, Lime-stone and Lime used as Manure, all Dung, Compost and Manure, and all Materials for Roads 2d per Ton, per Mile.
For all Copper, Tin, Lead and other Ores, and all Matters containing Ore, Copper, Tin, Lead, Iron, and other Metals; Timber, Coals, Coke, Culm, Cinders, Stone, Bricks, Earth, Clay, Chalk, Marl, Lime and Sand not used as Manure 3d ditto. ditto.
For Corn, Grain, Flour, and all other Goods and Commodities 4d ditto. ditto.

Fractions of a Mile and of a Ton to pay as the Quarters therein, and of a Quarter as a Quarter.

Parcels not exceeding Five Hundred Pounds in Weight, to be paid for according to a Rate decided upon by the Proprietors, who may reduce the Rates from Time to Time and raise them again, as Circumstances shall require.

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Wharfs, quays and warehouses may be erected by lords of manors or owners of lands on the line, which may be used for goods conveyed on the railroad, subject to the following
For all Coals. Culm, Lime, Lime-stone, Clay, Iron, Iron-stone, Copper-ore or other Ores, Timber, Stone, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Gravel and other Things 1d per Ton.
For every Package, not weighing more than Fifty-six Pounds 2d each.
For ditto, not weighing more than Three Hundred Pounds 3d ditto.
For ditto, not weighing more than Six Hundred Pounds 4d ditto.
For ditto, not weighing more than One Ton 6d ditto.
For all Packages above the Weight of One Ton 6d per Ton.

Packages remaining above Forty-eight Hours shall pay in addition for the next Seven Days, a Wharfage Rate of One Penny per Ton; and for Warehousing, a Rate of Two-pence per Ton respectively for the next Seven Days, and for every succeeding Seven Days.

The Company may also erect Wharfs and receive a Wharfage Rate of Four-pence per Ton for all Goods deposited thereon.

The estimate for this work was, as before stated, £22,500, of which £19,500 were subscribed before the passing of the act. The usual powers are granted for that part of the work, which relates to the navigation of Restrongett Creek, and regulations for the mooring of vessels therein, which it is not necessary to enumerate in these pages.

The main line of this railway commences at the extensive tin works on the east side of the town of Redruth, whence it takes a south-easterly course round the mountain of Cam Marth; thence north-easterly by Carrarath to Twelve Heads, whence it takes a south-eastward course by Nangiles and Carnon Gate to Point Quay, situate on an estuary branching out of Carreg Road. Its length is nine miles, two furlongs and four chains; in the first mile and seven chains of which, to Wheel Beauchamp, there is a rise of 103 feet; from thence to its termination it is one gradual inclination with a fall of 555 feet to high-water-mark. From Carnon Gate there is a branch to Narrabo of one mile one furlong; another branch from Nangiles to Wheel Fortune of three furlongs and five chains; another from Twelve Heads to Wheel Bissey, two miles, two furlongs and five chains in length; and another from Wheel Beauchamp to Wheel Buller, of two furlongs four chains in length. The total length of main line and branches is thirteen miles, three furlongs and eight chains, and the estimate, which was made by Mr. Richard Thomas, amounted to £21,900.

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The object of this railway is to facilitate the conveyance of the produce of the rich mineral district round Redruth for shipment.

REGENT'S CANAL.

52 Geo. III. C. 195, R. A. 13th July, 1812.

53 Geo. III. Cap. 32, R. A. 1.5th April, 1813.

56 Geo. III. C. 85, R. A. 2nd July, 1816.

59 Geo. III. Cap. 66, R. A. 14th June, 1819.

2 Geo. IV. C. 43, R. A. 19th April, 1821.

COMMENCING in the Paddington Branch of the Grand Junction Canal near the Harrow Road, and about one-third of a mile from the Edgeware Road, and proceeding to Maida Hill, it passes under the Edgeware Road by a short tunnel; thence crossing Grove Road, it arrives at Park Road, at the west angle of Regent's Park, near Mary-le-bone Chapel, thence passing Grove House and Portland Terrace, it runs eastward parallel to Primrose Hill Road; opposite the Zoological Gardens a branch runs southwards to Cumberland Market, where there is a basin, passing in its course the Horse Barracks and the Jews Harp. Following the main line from Water Meeting Bridge, near the Zoological Gardens, it proceeds eastward, crossing the Pancras Vale Road; then locking down, it again crosses another road called Camden Road, and the new road to Holloway; when passing the King's Road and Randolph's Prebends, it turns towards the south-east to Maiden Lane, whence it proceeds to Horsfall's Basin, a quarter of a mile from which place it enters the tunnel under White Conduit Street and the junction of the streets which communicate with the main and back road to Highgate; it next crosses the New River to Frog Lane, on the east of which is a lock, and also a branch, called the Basin, passing under the City Road; leaving Frog Lane Lock the main line continues its course eastward to the New North Road and Bridport Place. Running parallel with Felton Street, it leaves a second basin on its north bank, not far from Kingsland Road; from Kingsland Road it keeps an easterly course to a third basin, on its south bank, extending to the Imperial Gas Works; from this point it proceeds to the road leading from Margaret Street to London Fields; bending a little to the south, it crosses the Cambridge Heath Road; then diverging a little to the north east, it arrives at Old Ford Road, whence proceeding nearly south, it crosses Mile End Road; from Mile End Road it proceeds to

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Stepney Lane, whence winding to the south-east it passes Salmon Lane, and crossing the Commercial Road, arrives at the basin, from which it locks into the Thames, being a length of above eight miles and a half; with a fall of 90 feet, by twelve locks, exclusive of the tide lock.

This great and arduous undertaking was projected for the purpose of forming a continuous line of canal navigation from the Grand Junction at Paddington Basin, to the River Thames, and the various docks on the east side of the Metropolis; affording thereby an easy mode of conveying merchandize not only from the interior of the kingdom to London, but also to the intermediate parts of the city; and on the other hand to open a line of conveyance to the most distant parts of the country. The first act for this purpose was passed in the year 1812, under the title of 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from the Grand Junction Canal, in the parish of Paddington, to the River Thames, in the parish of Limehouse, with a collateral Cut in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, in the county of Middlesex.' By which act the proprietors were formed into a comnpany styled "The Company of Proprietors of the Regent's Canal," with power to make a canal, to be called the Regent's Canal, from and out of the Grand Junction Canal, in the parish of Paddington in the county of Middlesex, into and through several parishes to communicate with the Thames, in the parish of St. Anne's, Limehouse, and to make a navigable collateral cut from the same in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, to Aske Terrace, in the same parish; and to make and maintain all necessary inclined planes, steam-engines, reservoirs, channels, feeders, locks, tunnels, culverts, bridges, &c. &c. that may be required to complete time same. The canal may be supplied with water from all streams on its line and fromn the Thames, but no water is to be taken from the Thames, when lower than half-flood or ebb tide, nor from such streams as have been previously granted to the Grand Junction Company, nor from the streams, &c. belonging to the New River Company, nor from the Hampstead Water Works. For executing their plans, the proprietors are empowered to raise £300,000, in shares of £100 each; and in case that sum should prove insufficient, they mnay borrow, on mortgage, or on promissory notes,

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or by contributions amongst themselves, £100,000 additional. For the payment of interest on sums advanced and other contingent expenses the following are to be charged as

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Goods, Wares, Merchandize and other Things, which shall enter the Mouths of the said Canal, either from the Grand Junction Canal or from the River Thames, prior to being navigated or conveyed on the said Canal 0s 6d per Ton.
For all Lime, Lime-stone, Chalk, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Lead, Iron, Brass, Copper, Tin, Platina, Stone andTimber of every Kind, which shall be navigated or conveyed between the Basin next adjoining the Thames and the Turnpike-Road at Mile End, over and above the said Entrance Toll 0s 8d ditto.
For ditto, between the said Turnpike-Road at Mile End and the Turnpike-Road at Cambridge Heath, ditto 0s 6d ditto.
For ditto, between the said Turnpike-Road at Cambridge Heath and the Kingsland Turnpike-Road, ditto 0s 4d ditto.
For ditto, between the said Kingsland Turnpike-Road and the Junction of the said Collateral Cut with the said Canal, ditto 0s 4d ditto.
For ditto, between the same Collateral Cut, through the Tunnel at lslington and Maiden Lane, ditto 0s 9d ditto.
For ditto, between Maiden Lane aforesaid, and the Turnpike-Road leading from Camden Town to Kentish Town, ditto 0s 4d ditto.
For ditto, between the said last-mentioned Turnpike-Road and the Entrance of the said intended Canal, on the North-east Side of the Crown Land, called Mary-le-Bone Park, ditto 0s 4d ditto.
For ditto, between the Entrance of the said Canal into Mary-le-Bone Park aforesaid, through the Tunnel under the Edgeware Road, and the Entrance of the said Canal hereby authorized to be made, into the Grand Junction Canal, ditto 0s 9d ditto.

For all other Goods, Wares, Merchandire and Things, (except Coals, Coke, or other Minerals and Manure) which shall be respectively navigated or conveyed upon the several Parts or Portions of the said Canal or Collateral Cut herein-before described, a Rate or Sum per Ton equal to One Half in Addition to the respective Rates or Sums per Ton herein-before mentioned and made payable for Lime, Lime-stone, Chalk, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Lead, Iron, Brass, Copper, Tin, Platina, Stone and Timber.

For all Manure which shall be navigated or conveyed upon the several Parts or Portions of the said Canal and Collateral Cut herein-before described, a Rate or Sum per Ton equal to One Half of the respective Rates or Sums per Ton herein-before mentioned and made payable for Lime, Lime-stone, Chalk, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Lead, Iron, Brass, Copper, Tin, Platina, Stone and Timber.
For all Lime, Lime-stone, Chalk, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Lead, Iron, Brass, Copper, Tin, Platina, Stone and Timber of every Kind, which shall be navigated or conveyed upon the said Canal the whole Length thereof, including the said Entrance Toll 3s 0d per Ton.
For all Lime-stone, Chalk, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Lead, Iron, Brass, Copper, Tin, Platina, Stone and Timber of every Kind, which shall be navigated or conveyed upon the said Canal, from and out of the said Grand Junction Canal to the said Turnpike-Road at Cambridge Heath aforesaid 2s 4d ditto.
For all other Goods, Wares, Merchandise and Things, (except Coals, Coke, or other Minerals and Manure) which shall be navigated or conveyed upon the said Canal from and out of the said Grand Junction Canal to the said Turnpike-Road at Cambridge Heath aforesaid 3s 6d ditto.
For all Manure which shall be navigated or conveyed upon the said Canal, from and out of the said Grand Junction Canal, to tbe said Turnpike-Road at Cambridge Heath aforesaid 1s 2d ditto.
For all Coals. Coke, or other Minerals which shall be navigated or conveyed between the River Thames and the said Turnpike-Road at Cambridge Heath 1s 0d ditto.

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TONNAGE RATES CONTINUED.

For ditto, between the said Turnpike-Road at Cambridge Heath, and the Turnpike-Road leading from Camden Town to Kentish Town 0s 6d per Ton.
For ditto, between the said Turnpike-Road leading from Camden Town to Kentish Town and the Grand Junction Canal 1s 0d ditto.
For all other Goods, Wares, Merchandize and Things, (except Coals, Coke, or other Minerals and Manure) which shall be navigated or conveyed upon the said Canal, the whole Length thereof, including the said Entrance Toll 4s 6d ditto.
For all Manure which shall be navigated or conveyed upon the said Canal, the whole Length thereof, including the said Entrance Toll 1s 6d ditto.
For all Coals, Coke or other Minerals, Lime, Lime-stone, Chalk, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, Lead, Iron, Brass, Copper, Tin, Platina, Stone, Timber, and all other Goods, Waxes, Merchandize and Things, which shall be navigated and conveyed upon the Collateral Cut hereby authorized to be made 0s 2d ditto.
For every Horse, Mare, Gelding, Mule or Ass, passing on any Towing-path belonging to the Company, (not haling or drawing any Boat, Barge or other Vessel, nor going from Field to Field, or to or from Water or Pasture) before the same shall be permitted to pass through any Bar or Gate, or Bars or Gates (which Bars and Gates the said Company of Proprietors hereby incorporated are hereby empowered to erect, or cause to be erected) 0s 6d each.

Vessels not passing the whole Length of any of the above Portions of the Line, shall nevertheless pay the full Tolls, except Vessels navigated on the Canal out of the Grand Junction the whole Distance to Cambridge Heath; and all Vessels passing Locks with less than Thirty Tons of heavy Goods, shall pay for Thirty Tons.

Fractions of a Ton to pay for the Quarters therein, but Boats or other Vessels coming out of the Grand Junction shall only pay for their actual Tonnage.

Land-owners on the Line may convey Manure to their Property free of Tolls; they may also use Pleasure-boats on the Canal, provided they do not pass any Lock, in which Case they shall pay the regular Rate.

The tunnel under the New River is to be constructed under the inspection of the surveyor of that company; and all alterations in pipes, &c. to be made with the approbation of the companies to which they belong. Land-owners, lords of manors, or, in case they refuse, the company may make wharfs, warehouses and other conveniences. For these wharfs the following are to be demanded as

WHARFAGE RATES.

For all Minerals, Timber and other Goods, lying thereon Twenty-four hours 3d per Ton.
For ditto above Twenty-four Hours and not exceeding Thirty Days 6d ditto.

Coal, Iron and Lime-stone may remain Three Months, paying Sixpence per Ton; but the other Goods after Thirty Days, shall pay One Farthing per Ton additional for every succeeding Day.

An ornamental piece of water is to be made and supplied by the company in Mary-le-bone or Regent's Park, in which park no wharf or towing-path is, to be made, except on the north side thereof; and the works in this park are to be finished in one year.

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The rights of the corporation of London, as conservators of the Thames, are to be preserved, and the company is to pay them an annuity of £450, as a compensation for the diminution of tolls. A stop or pound lock is to be made for regulating the quantity of water to be taken from the Grand Junction, and to restrain the company from introducing more than a certain quantity of water into the cut at Paddiugton. This is a very long act, containing a vast number of clauses for protecting the rights of public bodies and private individuals, but we have given above those parts only which are of general interest.

A second act was obtained by the company in 1813, under the title of 'An Act to amend an Act of the last Session of Parliament, for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from the Grand Junction Canal, in the parish of Paddington, to the River Thames, in the parish of Limehouse, with a collateral Cut, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, in the county of Middlesex;' whereby the former act was amended, as far as regarded that part of the work intended to pass through Regent's Park, and an addition thereto towards the south-eastern extremity of the said park is hereby directed to be made, for repaying the extra cost of which, the following is to be demanded from every vessel using this intended cut, as an additional

TONNAGE RATE.

For all Goods, Wares and Merchandize 3d per Ton.

Fractions of a Ton to pay for the Quarters therein.

A third act was obtained in 1816, entitled, 'An Act for altering and amending an Act made in the Fifty-second of his present Majesty, for making a Canal from the Grand Junction Canal, in the parish of Paddington, to the River Thames, in the parish of Limehouse.' By this act the company is allowed to raise an additional sum of £200,000 for the completion of the works, either by subscription amongst the present subscribers, or by creating new shares and half shares, or by mortgage, or by granting annuities, or by bonds of £100, each bearing interest of £5 per cent, per annum, payable out of the tolls. This act contains a clause to explain which is the proper line through certain grounds belonging William Agar, Esq. at Pancras; and another

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authorizing the Bishop of London or his lessee to make docks, basins, wharfs, cranes, warehouses, &c. on the land belonging the Diocese of London; as also another, empowering the company to supply the Grand Junction Canal Company with water from the Thames.

In 1819 a fourth act was obtained under the title of 'An Act for altering and amending the several Acts passed for making a Canal from the Grand Junction Canal, in the parish of Paddington, to the River Thames, in the parish of Limehouse, in the county of Middlesex;' whereby the proprietors are empowered to make a collateral cut or canal from that part of the main line which runs through the land of Samuel Pullin, Esq. in St. Mary's, Islington, to pass through and form a dock or basin in the lands of the Prebendary of Wenlock's Barn, and to cross the road from Islington to Finsbury Square, called the city, with all necessary wharfs, warehouses, &c. and to make all requisite cuts and feeders for supplying the same with water from the Thames, and to deepen the basin and channel from the Thames in Limehouse and Stepney, so that the same may admit ships and other vessels. They are also by this act authorized to raise an additional sum of £200,000, in the usual way. The following are granted as additional

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Goods. Wares and Merchandize navigated on the intended new Cut 0s 6d per Ton.
For all Ships entering the Ship Channel or Basin 6s 0d ditto.
For all Boats and Barges ditto 4s 0d ditto.

Fractions of a Ton to be paid for according to the Quarters therein.

Water is not to be taken from the Thames, except under certain restrictions mentioned in the act, and the company are to pay to the city of London five guineas per annum, as an acknowledgment for cutting the shore and bed of the Thames below low-water-mark, for the purpose of laying pipes therein; they may also put down two dolphin piles at Limehouse for the haling of vessels into and out of the basin. Several other clauses are inserted for preserving the rights of various parties.

Some doubts having occurred relative to the power of the Commissioners of Exchequer Bills to advance a further sum to this

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company, another act was obtained in 1821, entitled, 'An Act to remove Doubts as to the Power of the Commissioners of Exchequer Bills to advance a further Sum of Money to the Regent's Canal Company, and to amend the Acts for making the said Canal.' By this act, which recites the sums already advanced by the commissioners to the company, the said commissioners are empowered to advance a further sum of £200,000 to the said company.

In the year 1827, the Commissioners authorized to issue Exchequer Bills, made an offer to the Regent's Canal Company of a compromise for the whole of the debt due from the canal company, if paid within a certain time, for a much less sum than it amounted to, which offer was complied with; and in order to avail themselves of so advantageous a proposal, a certain number of new shares were created, which produced the money required, and the debt was discharged accordingly.

These shares were taken by the proprietors in proportion to the number of old shares they held, and both kinds of shares now stand in equal value; for notwithstanding shares were selling at the time at £50 each, and the newly created offered at £30, yet as the new shares were offered only to the old shareholders, it had the effect of raising money to pay the debt by calls upon the stock.

Hence the company have now the power of dividing the whole nett proceeds of the work amongst the shareholders; and from its localities, circumscribing, as it does, a great portion of London, together with its other connections, there is the fairest prospect that it will become a very lucrative concern.

To have described the cassoon locks and other mechanical inventions made use of to save the expenditure of water upon this canal, would answer no purpose, as they have been exploded, and the usual and more simple means adopted.

The engineering department of this concern is under the direction of Mr. Morgan.

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RIBBLE RIVER.

46 George III. Cap. 121, Royal Assent 12th July, 1806.

THE act for improving the navigation of the Ribble was obtained in 1806, under the title of 'An Act for improving the Navigation of the River Ribble, in the county palatine of Lancaster;' and by it the proprietors were incorporated as "The Company of Proprietors of the Undertaking, for the Improvement of the Navigation of the River Ribble," with powers to change certain parts of the channel of the same, and to place marks, buoys and signal posts near the obstructions in the same, more particularly at its mouth, beginning the work at Penwortham Bridge near Preston, in Lancashire, and running by Kirkham, in the said county, to the sea. For executing these works the proprietors are empowered to contribute £2,000, in shares of £50 each; but should this sum prove insufficient, they may raise £1,000 in addition, either on security of the works, or by subscription amongst themselves. They are authorized to appoint pilots and to demand according to the following scale as

TONNAGE AND PILOTAGE RATES.

For every British Vessel entering or leaving the Port of Preston 2s 6d per Ton.
For every Foreign Vessel ditto 3s 0d ditto.
For Pilotage from Preston Quay to Naize Point and Frecleton Pool, or vice versa, if a British Sloop or Vessel with One Mast 2s 6d per Foot of Water drawn.
For ditto with Two or more Masts 3s 0d ditto. ditto.
From Naize Point and Frecleton Pool to the furthest or West Buoy next the Sea, or vice versa, for every British Vessel 2s 0d ditto. ditto.

For every Foreign Ship or Vessel, double the aforesaid Rates.

Government Vessels, Vessels carrying Stones or Merchandise within the Limits of the Port of Preston, Vessels coming from or going to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal and the Douglas Navigation or either of them, through the present or any future Communication made between them and the Ribble, are exempted from the Rates and Duties. Vessels under Fifty Tons may be Piloted by their Masters, and no unlicensed Person is to be fined for assisting Vessels in Distress.

This work commences at Penwortham Bridge, near Preston, and proceeds for a distance of about eleven miles to its mouth in the Irish Sea, in a direation nearly due west; it is crossed not far from its commencement by the railway bridge belonging to the

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