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This Book "Priestley's Navigable Rivers and Canals" by Joseph Priestley was previously published in April 1831. NOTE: Oringinally called "Historical Account of the Navigable Rivers, Canals, and Railways, of Great Britain".
For more information see About this Book

Index Page Link to Previous Page 199

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within a mile of Wincaunton, whence it takes a northerly course, crossing the River Frome two miles north-west of Bruton; thence, along its western bank, and by Marston House to Frome, where it again crosses the river, and follows its course by the village of Road to the Kennet and Avon Canal at Widbrook, near the town of Bradford. A branch proceeds from Frome, by a very circuitous course, to the collieries at Nettle Bridge, situate near the eastern termination of the Mendip Hills.

The royal assent was given to an act for making this canal on the 24th of March, 1796, which is entitled, 'An Act for making a navigable Canal from or near Gains Cross, in the parish of Shillingston Okeford, in the county of Dorset, to communicate with the Kennet and Avon Canal at or near Widbrook, in the county of Wilts; and also a certain navigable Branch from the intended Canal.' The subscribers to this undertaking were incorporated by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Dorset and Somerset Navigation," and empowered to raise among themselves the sum of £150,000, in fifteen hundred shares of £100 each, and an additional sum of £75,000, either by the admission of new subscribers, or on mortgage of the undertaking. Although another act was obtained in 1803, entitled, 'An Act for enabling the Company of Proprietors of the Dorset and Somerset Canal Navigation to raise a further Sum of Money towards completing the said Canal, and for altering and amending an Act passed in the Thirty-sixth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, for making and maintaining the said Navigation,' yet it does not appear that any portion of the main line of canal was ever executed. A portion of the Nettle Bridge Branch was excavated; and upon a fall of 21 feet at Mells, near Frome, one of Fusell's balance locks was erected, and publicly tried on the 6th of September and 13th of October, with vessels of ten tons burthen; but, in consequence of the abandonment of the works generally, it never came into useful operation. The parliamentary line of this canal was forty miles in length, and the branch nine miles.

The chief object proposed by the projectors of this scheme, was to open an inland communication between the mining and manufacturing districts of Somerset, Gloucester, and Wilts, with the English Channel and the agricultural counties of Dorset and Hants.

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DOUGLAS NAVIGATION.

(SEE LEEDS AND LIVERPOOL CANAL.)

DRIFFIELD NAVIGATION.

7 George III. Cap. 97, Royal Assent 20th May, 1767.

41 George III. Cap. 134, Royal Assent 2nd July, 1801.

57 George III. Cap. 64, Royal Assent 7th July, 1817.

THIS navigation commences at Aike Beck Mouth, in the River Hull, about four miles and a half north of Beverley, and half a mile above the place where the Leven Canal falls into that river. Its course is northwardly, passing Baswick Steer and Emmotland, to Fisholme Clough, to which place the navigation is continued along the original course of the Hull River, excepting in one instance, where a cut of three quarters of a mile in length is made near Hempholme, for the purpose of avoiding a circuitous part of the river. From Fisholme Clough, the remainder of the navigation to Great Driffield, is by an entire canal of nearly five miles and a half in length. The river part of this navigation, to Fisholme Clough, is five miles and three quarters; but the navigation is extended up Frodingham Beck, to the bridge, a distance of nearly a mile. From thence there is a private navigable cut made to Foston Mills, by the proprietor thereof, which is about three quarters of a mile in length.

The first act relating to this navigation was passed in the 7th of George III. and is entitled, 'An Act for improving the Navigation of the River Hull and Frodingham Beck, from Aike Beck Mouth to the Clough, on the East Corner of Fisholme, and for extending the said Naviqation, from the said Clough, into or near the town of Great Driffield, in the East Riding of the county of York;' in the preamble of which it is stated, that it was then navigable to Fisholme, but might be greatly improved. Accordingly commissioners were appointed by this act to carry the necessary measures into effect, and to cut the canal to Driffield; for which purpose, they are empowered to borrow any sum of money, on security of the rates and duties, and, for the repayment of which, and legal interest, the act empowered them to demand the following tonnage rates.

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TONNAGE RATES.

Wheat, Rye, Beans, Peas, or Rapeseed 0s 6d per Quarter.
Malt, Oats, Barley, or any other Sort of Grain 0s 4d ditto.
Meal or Flour 0s 6d per Sack.
Coal, Culm, or Cinders 3s 6d per Chaldron of 48 Bushels.
Brick, Stone, Tile, or Lime, for Building 3s 6d per Ton.
All other Goods, Wares, or Merchandize whatsoever 4s 0d ditto. ditto.

And so in proportion for any greater or less Weight.

For any Goods, Wares, or Merchandize carried to or from the Village of Brigham, (which is situate Three Quarters of a Mile from Fisholme Clough,) a Moiety only of the above Tolls is to be demanded.

Pleasure Boats to pay for passing through each Lock the Sum of Sixpence.

A Public Wharf with Cranes is directed to be made at Great Driffield; the Rates and Duties payable thereat, to be settled by the Commissioners, or any Seven of them.

In the preamble of another act, passed in the 41st of George III. entitled, 'An Act to amend an Act, passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, entitled, An Act for improving the Navigation of the River Hull and Frodingham Beck, from Aike Beck Mouth to the Clough, on the East Corner of Fisholme, and for extending the said Navigation,from the said Clough, into or near the town of Great Driffield, in the East Riding of the county of York, and to extend and improve the said Navigation,' it is stated, that the commissioners had made considerable improvements in the navigation, but it was still very imperfect; they, therefore, obtain power to make cuts for avoiding considerable bends, particularly one from opposite Goodall Clough to Seven Hills; another from Emmotland to Corps Landing, situate on the West Beck; and to widen and make navigable the beck to Frodingham Bridge; also to take down and rebuild, within six years, Hull Bridge, near Beverley, and to maintain a towing path from that bridge to Fisholme.

In addition to the tolls granted by the preceding act, the following may be demanded for every article passing on any of the cuts.

ADDITIONAL RATES.

Wheat, Rye, Beans, Peas, or Rapeseed 0s 3d per Quarter.
Malt, Oats, Barley, or any other Grain 0s 2d ditto.
Meal or Flour 0s 3d per Sack of Five Bushels.
Coal, Culm, or Cinders 1s 9d per Chaldron of 48 Bushels.
Brick, Stone, Tile, or Lime, for Building 1s 9d per Ton.
All other Goods, Wares or Merchandize 2s 0d ditto.

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TOWING PATH RATE.

For every Description of Merchandize towed along the River by the Haling Paths from Hull Bridge to Fisholme, Corps-landing, and Frodingham 0s 0¼d per Ton, per Mile.

After Hull Bridge is rebuilt, a Pontage Rate of Two Shillings and Sixpence will be levied on every Vessel passing under it, in lieu of the present Charge of Four-pence which has hitherto been paid to the Corporation of the Town of Beverley, to whom the Bridge belonged.

For the Purpose of determining what Rates the Owners or Occupiers of Foston Mills (to which there is a private Navigation from Frodingham Bridge,) shall pay, an Arbitrator is appointed, whose Award is to be final.

The last act relating to this navigation received the royal assent on the 7th of July, 1817, and is entitled, 'An Act to amend and enlarge the Powers of Two Acts of his present Majesty, for improving the Navigation of the River Hull and Frodinyham Beck, and extending the same to the town of Great Driffield, in the county of York,' in the preamble of which it is stated, that the commissioners borrowed, under authority of the act of 7th George III. the sum of £15,175, which sum was yet owing when the act was passed, together with an arrear of interest, amounting to £8,194, l0s.; and for carrying on the works directed to be done under the act of 41st George III. the sum of £6,143, 8s. was raised by subscription, of which sum, £4,300, 7s. 9d. was repaid, leaving due £1,843, 0s. 3d.; this act, therefore, directs that so soon as the principal and interest due to the mortgagees is paid off; the tolls are to be reduced, so that no greater income be derived from this navigation than is necessary to keep it in proper repair, and pay other incidental expenses.

To prevent the water in the river at Frodingham Bridge from being raised so as to injure the drainage of the adjacent lands, a mark was made in a stone on the steeple of Frodingham Church, on the 15th of September, 1815, which is 15 feet 11 inches above the level of the surface water; and by which the height of the water is to be hereafter regulated.

This navigation is chiefly used for the, import of coal from time West Riding, and timber, deals, and groceries from Hull; and to export wool, corn, and other farming produce from the East Riding.

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DROITWICH CANAL.

8 George III. Cap 37, Royal Assent 29th January, 1768.

THIS canal commences at Chapel Bridge, in the town of Droitwich, whence it takes a south-eastwardly course, running parallel with, and on the south bank of the Salwarp River, by the village of that name, and at a short distance from Westwood, the seat of Sir John Packington, Bart.; hence its course is continued by Woods Mill, and it terminates haifa mile west of Hawford Lodge, and where the above-mentioned river falls into the Severn.

It is five miles and three quarters in length, with a fall, to the Severn, of 56 feet 6 inches, by eight locks; and it was made under the authority of an act of 8th George III. entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Cut or Canal from the River Severn, at or near a place called Hawford, in the parish of Claines, in the county of Worcester, to or near a place called Chapel Bridge, within the borough of Droitwich, in the said county.' The subscribers to this undertaking were incorporated by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Droitwich Canal Navigation," with power to raise among themselves the sum of £33,400, in three hundred and thirty-four shares of £100 each; and a further sum of £20,000, either among themselves or by the admission of new subscribers. The original proprietors are restricted to seven shares each; unless new ones be taken, for the purpose of raising the additional £20,000, in which case they may have five in addition.

TONNAGE RATES.

Salt, Coal, Stone, Slate or Flags 1s 6d per Ton.
Wheat, Rye, Beans, Peas, Malt, Barley, Oats, or other Grain 0s 2d per Quarter.
Meal 0s 2d per Six Bushels.
All other Goods, Wares, or Merchandize 1s 6d per Ton.

A clause is inserted in an act of the 31st George III. cap. 59, for making the Worcester and Birmingham Canal, by which that company are bound to make compensation to the Droitwich Canal Company for any diminution which may be made in the profits of their concern below five per cent, on every share, each being

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reckoned at £160 at the least. This navigation was carried into execution by Mr. Brindley, and for the excellency of the works, is thought to be his chef d'ouvre.

The principal object the proprietors of this concern had in view, was to bring coal up to Droitwich, and to export salt, which is made from the brine springs abounding in the vicinity of that town, and which have so strongly impregnated the water of this canal, that the common fresh-water fish cannot live in it.

DUDLEY CANAL.

16 Geo. III. C. 66, R. A. 2nd Apr. 1776.

25 Geo. III. C. 87, R. A. 4th July, 1785.

30 Geo. III. C. 60, R. A. 7th May, 1790.

33 Geo. III. C. 121, R. A. 17th June, 1793.

37 Geo. III. C. 13, R. A. 23rd Dec. 1796.

THIS canal commences from the Worcester and Birmingham Canal, near Selly Oak, in Worcestershire, and proceeds in a westwardly course to near Stone House, where it enters the Lapal Tunnel, which is three thousand seven hundred and Seventy-six yards in length. From the west end of the tunnel at Lapal Lane (which is in a detached part of Shropshire,) the canal pursues a northerly course by the Leasowes, and within half a mile of the town of Hales Owen; a short distance beyond which, it enters another tunnel six hundred and twenty-three yards long, and egresses into the county of Stafford, near Gosty Hill, whence it continues a north-westwardly course to near Netherton; and after taking a circuit round the base of a hill to Dudley Woodside, enters a third tunnel two thousand nine hundred and twenty-six yards in length, and emerges near Tipton Green, within a short distance of which, it communicates with the Birmingham Canal. From near Dudley Woodside, a branch proceeds to join the Stourbridge Canal at Black Delph, about a mile north of the town of Stourbridge.

The main line of canal is thirteen miles in length, ten miles and a half of which, from Selly Oak, is level; thence, to the entrance of the Dudley Tunnel, there are five locks, rising 31 feet, and in the last furlong, before entering the Birmingham Canal, there is a fall of 13 feet, by two locks. The Black Delph Branch is two miles in length, with a fall, to the Stourhridge Canal, of 85 feet, by nine locks; the lockage water of which is chiefly supplied from Cradley Pool Reservoir.

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The first act relating to this navigation was obtained in the 16th of George III. and entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal, within and from certain Lands belonging to Thomas Talbot Foley, Esq. in the parish of Dudley, in the county of Worcester, to join and communicate with the Stourbridge Navigation, at a place called Black Delph, upon Pensnet Chace, in the parish of Kingswinford, in the county of Stafford.' The original subscribers to this canal were only twenty-one in number; amongst whom, however, was the Right Honourable John Lord Dudley and Ward. They were incorporated by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Dudley Canal Navigation," with power to raise among themselves the sum of £7,000, in seventy shares of £100 each; and an additional sum of £5,000, either among themselves, or by the admission of new subscribers. By this act were also granted the following

TONNAGE RATES.

Iron, Iron-stone, Coal, Timber, Stone, and all other Goods, Wares, and Merchandize, (for the whole Length, or any part of it) 6d per Ton.

Wharfage to be charged for any Goods lying more than Twenty-four Hours.

EXEMPTION.

Lime and Lime-stone to pay only One-third of the above Rates; but Paving-stones, Gravel, Sand, and other Materials for the repair of Roads, (except Lime-stone) Dung, Soil, Marl, and all Sorts of Manure for the improvement only of Lands belonging to Persons whose Lands may be taken for this Canal is exempt, provided they do not pass a Lock, except at such times as when the Water flows over the Lock Weir.

Forty Feet of Round, or Fifty Feet of Square Oak, Ash, or Elm Timber, and Fifty Feet of Fir, or Deal, Balk, Poplar, and other Wood, shall be deemed a Ton; and Six Score Pounds Avoirdupois shall be deemed a Hundred Weight for the Purposes of this Act.

Boats under Fifteen Tons not to pass Locks without leave.

Owners of lands may erect wharfs, and are allowed the following rates.

RATES OF WHARFAGE.

For Coal, Lime, Lime-stone, Clay, Iron, Gravel, Timber, Stone, Brick, Tile, or Slate, which shall lie on the Wharfs more than Six Hours during the Day 1½d per Ton.
Any other Goods or Merchandize which shall not continue more than Six Days 3d ditto.

The second act was obtained in 1785, for the purpose of opening a communication with the Birmingham Canal, which they were prohibited from doing by a clause in the former act. It is

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entitled, 'An Act for extending the Dudley Canal to the Birmingham Canal, at or near Tipton Green, in the county of Stafford;' and by which the Dudley Canal Company are empowered to incorporate a certain number of new subscribers, to enable them to raise the sum of £22,000, and an additional £5,000, if necessary, for the purpose of carrying into execution the works proposed; and the following are the additional rates allowed to be taken on this canal.

ADDITIONAL TONNAGE RATES.

Coal, Coke, and Iron-stone, which shall have paid Tonnage to the Birmingham Canal 3d per Ton.
For the same Articles, for which no Rates shall have been paid to the said Canal, and which shall pass through any part of the Dudley Tunnel 3d ditto.
For the same Articles which pass between the South End of the Tunnel and the present Dudley Canal 3d ditto.
For the same Goods got or raised within a Mile of the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, and which shall pass into the said Birmingham Canal ½d ditto.
Lime and Lime-stone which shall pass out of the South End of the Tunnel 4½ d ditto.
For the same which shall pass into the Birmingham Canal ½d ditto.
For all Stone, Timber, and other Goods 6d ditto.

The original shares in the Dudley Canal were sixty-five; and they may, by this act, be increased to one hundred and thirty.

In consideration of the permission granted to the Dudley Canal to connect with the Birmingham Canal, the proprietors of the last-mentioned navigation have had secured to them certain tonnage rates; for particulars of which, see Birmingham Canal Navigation, p. 68.

By another act which received the royal sanction on the 7th of May, 1790, entitled., 'An Act for effectually carrying into Execution Two Acts passed in the Sixteenth and Twenty-fifth Years of the Reign of his present Majesty, for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from the Stourbridge Navigation to the Birmingham and Birmingham and Fazeley Canal Navigation, in the counties of Worcester and Stafford,' the company are authorized to raise among themselves, for the purposes set forth in the title of the act, the sum of £10,100, to be divided into new shares. They may also, if necessary, borrow the further sum of £10,000, on mortgage of the undertaking.

The act of the 33rd George III. enabling the Dudley Canal Company to connect their navigation with the Worcester and

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Birmingham Canal, received the royal assent on the 17th June, 1793; it is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from the Dudley Canal, in the county of Worcester, to the Worcester and Birmingham Canal, now making at or near Selly Oak, in the said county; and also certain collateral Cuts to communicate therewith.' The new subscribers to this extension are incorporated and made part of the Dudley Canal Company, who are hereby empowered to raise £90,000, in nine hundred shares of £100 each, and an additional sum of £40,000, if necessary.

TONNAGE RATES.

Coal or Coke passing through the Lapal Tunnel, towards the Birmingham and Worcester Canal, but which shall not pass along the last-mentioned Canal, towards Birmingham, nor have paid any of the Rates or Duties payable to them under the Act of the 25th of his present Majesty 2s 0d per Ton.
For the same Articles which shall have passed in the Direction above-mentioned, and which have paid any of the Rates and Dues under the said Act of 25th George III 1s 9d ditto.
For all Coal and Coke conveyed in the Direction above-described, and which shall have passed towards the Town of Birmingham, along that part of the Worcester and Birmingham Canal, and none other, nor have paid any of the Duties under the Act above recited 2s 0d ditto.
For the same Articles passing in the above Direction towards Birmingham, and which shall have paid the Dues authorized to be demanded under the Act above-mentioned 1s 9d ditto.
Coal, Coke, and Iron-stone carried between the present Dudley Canal and the Lapel Tunnel, and which shall not pass into or through the Tunnel, or into the present Dudley Canal 0s 2d per Ton, per Mile.
The above Articles carried between the Lapal Tunnel, and which shall pass out of this Canal, and into the present Dudley Canal, without having passed into or out of the said Tunnel 0s 6d per Ton.
For all Goods, Wares, and Merchandize, (except Coal, Coke, Lime, and Lime-stone,) which shalt pass into or through Lapel Tunnel, and which shall not have paid any of the Duties liable under the Act of 25th George III. 2s 0d ditto.
For the above Articles which shall pass into or through) the Tunnel above-mentioned, and which shall have paid the Charges under the above-recited Act 1s 6d ditto.
For all Goods, Wares, and other Merchandize (except Coal, Coke, Iron-stone, Lime and Lime-stone,) carried between the present Dudley Canal and Lapal Tunnel, without passing into or through such Tunnel 0s 2d per Ton, per Mile.
For all Goods, Wares, Merchandise, Lime, Lime-stone, and other Commodities, carried between the Worcester and Birmingham Canal, and the East End of Lapal Tunnel, and which shall not have passed through such Tunnel 0s 3d per Ton.
Lime and Lime-stone, which shall have paid the Tonnage imposed by the Act of 25th George III. upon Lime and Lime-stone, passing out of the South End of the Dudley Tunnel, and which shall not pass through the Gosty Hill Tunnel 0s 1d per Ton, per Mile.

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TONNAGE RATES CONTINUED.

Lime snd Lime-stone, which shall have paid the Tonnage as above directed, and which shall pass through the Gosty Hill Tunnel 0s 4½d per Ton.
Lime and Lime-stone, which has not paid the Duties under the Act of 25th George III. upon Lime and Lime-stone, passing out of the South End of Dudley Tunnel, and for which no other Rate is imposed by this present Act 0s 9d ditto.
For all Goods, Wares, Merchandise, and Commodities, navigated on that part of the Dudley Canal made under the Powers of an Act of the 16th George III. and which shall not be liable to any other Rates in the 16th and 25th of George III. or this present Act 0s 2d per Ton, per Mile.

There is a clause in this act which restrains the Dudley Canal Company from reducing the rates on any goods passing out of the Stourbridge Canal into this navigation, without first obtaining consent from the Worcester and Birmingham Canal Company, which company have, in return, agreed that when any reduction of the customary rates for navigating their canal shall take place, a similar reduction shall be made on all goods passing from the Dudley Canal, except such as go towards Birmingham; and they further agree to take such rates only as will be found particularly described under the head, 'Worcester and Birmingham Canal.'

A stop lock is, by this act, directed to be made within five hundred yards of the Worcester and Birmingham Canal, to prevent loss of water; and if the two canals are not kept on one level, the passage may be stopped. It is also enacted, that if by reason of making this canal, the profits of the Stourbridge Navigation shall be reduced below £12 on each share, the Dudley Canal Company shall make up the deficiency, provided it does not amount to more than £3 per share, and provided the last-mentioned company shall, in the same year, have received by their rates £5 on each share.

The Worcester and Birmingham Canal Company are also, by this act, exonerated from the operations of that clause which rendered them liable to make up deficiencies to the Dudley Canal Company.

The last parliamentary enactment relating to this canal, occurs in the 37th of George III. and is entitled, 'An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Dudley Canal Navigation, to raise a further Sum of Money for completing the said Navigation; and for amending the several Acts relating thereto;' in the preamble

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of which we learn, that a considerable portion of the work, authorized by the preceding act of the 33rd George III. had been done, but that the sumns they were empowered to raise by the above act being insufficient, the proprietors obtained power to raise among themselves, in proportion to their respective shares, (which amount to the sum of £175,325, deducting the sum of £6,000, which was directed to be raised by mortgage of the undertaking, or by the admission of new subscribers,) the sum of £40,000, which shall be raised and be made payable in the same way as if the whole sum of £40,000, authorized to be raised by the last-recited act, had been paid. The calls to be made in respect of the last-mentioned sum, is not to exceed, at any one time, the sum of £3 per cent. on the sum of £175,325, deducting the sum of £6,000 borrowed, or to be borrowed on mortgage, save and except two calls of £6 per cent, each on the above sum, to be made in March and September next ensuing the passing of this act. The proprietors have power to raise the above sum of £40,000, by mortgage of the undertaking, should they prefer it to the mode above-recited; or the company's committee may borrow the above sum on their bond.

The depth of this canal is 5 feet, and width of the locks 7 feet; and the principal articles carried upon it are coal, iron-stone, lime, lime-stone, and manufactured iron goods; but in consequence of the communication which is effected with the Severn, by means of the Stourbridge Navigation, and by the Worcester and Birmingham Canal to the town of Birmingham, and thence, by numerous canals, to all parts of the midland counties and the eastern ports, a general and very extensive trade has been established upon this truly useful and improving navigation.

DUFFRYN LLYNVI AND PORTH CAWL RAILWAY.

6 George IV. Cap. 104, Royal Assent 10th June, 1825.

10 George IV. Cap. 38, Royal Assent 14th May, 1829.

THIS railway commences at the harbour of Pwll, or Porth Cawl, near Newton Nottage, in Glamorganshire, whence it proceeds by the above-named village, South Corneley and North Corneley, to Pyle, then taking an eastwardly course by the iron

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works near Cefn Gribbwr, at which place the Bridgend Railway communicates with it. Hence, its course is by the collieries west of St. Brides Minor; it then changes to a northerly direction, running parallel with, and on the west side of the Little River Llynvi, by Cavenydan, the village of Llangonoyd, and round the east side of Troedrhwy Garth; and at about a mile north of this place, it crosses the river, near Typhylly Chwyth, to Duifryn Llynvi, where it terminates. Its length is sixteen miles and three quarters; the first seven of which, from the sea, is one inclined plane, rising 200 feet; in the next seven miles and a quarter, it rises 180 feet; it then rises 110 feet in the following two nmiles and seven chains; from whence, to its termination at Duifryn Llynvi, it is level. The estimate for this work was made by Mr. John Hodgkinson, and amounted to the sum of £40,000. The act for making it received the royal assent on the 10th of June, 1825, and is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway or Tramroad from, or from near to, a certain place called Duffryn Llynvi, in the parish of Llangonoyd, in the county of Glamorgan, to, or near to, a certain Bay, called Pwll Cawl, otherwise Porth Cawl, in the parish of Newton Nottage, in the same county; and for extending and improving the said Bay, by the Erection of a Pier and other suitable Works for that Purpose.' The subscribers consisted of fifty-seven persons, amongst whom were the Earl of Dunraven, Sir John Nicholl and Sir Digby Mackworth, Baronets, who were incorporated by the name of" The Duifryn Llynvi and Porth Cawl Railway Company," with power to raise among themselves the sum of £40,000, in four hundred shares of £100 each, for the purposes of this act (and which had already been subscribed before application was made to parliament,) and a further sum of £20,000, on mortgage of the undertaking.

TONNAGE RATES.

Lime-stone, Lime, Materials for the repair of Turnpike Roads or Highways, Dung, Compost, and all Sorts of Manure ½d per Ton, per Mile.
Coal, Culm, Coke, Cinders, Stone, Marl, Sand, Clay, Iron-stone, Ironore, and other Minerals, Building-stone, Pitching and Paving-stone, Bricks, Tiles, Slates, and all Gross and Unmanufactured Articles 1d ditto. ditto.
Iron, Lead, Timber, Staves, and Deals, and all other Goods, Wares, and Merchandize 2½d ditto. ditto.

Fractions to be taken as for a Quarter of a Mile and as for a Quarter of a Ton.

For the Purposes of the Act, Twenty-one Hundred Weight shall be deemed a Ton.

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HARBOUR DUES.

For every Ship or Vessel (except his Majesty's Vessels, and such as shal by Stress of Weather, be driven into, or in consequence of Accident at Sea, enter the said Bay, and shall not unload her Cargo for the Purpose of Sale) 2d per Ton.

The Burthen to be ascertained and charged according to the Custom-House Register.

Lords of manors or owners of lands may erect wharfs, but they are restricted to the following

WHARFAGE RATES.

Coal, Culm, Lime, Lime-stone, Clay, Iron, lron-stone, Iron-ore, Lead-ore, or any other Ores, Timber, Stone, Brick, Tiles, Slate, Gravel, or other Things 1d per Ton.
For any Package not exceeding Fifty-six Pounds Weight 2d.
For any Package above Three Hundred Pounds Weight and not exceeding Six 4d.
For any Package exceeding One Thousand Pounds Weight 6d.

The above Rates to be paid if the Goods remain on the Wharfs more than Two Calendar Months; but should such Articles continue above that Time, there shall be paid the further Sum of One Penny per Ton for Wharfage and Two.pence per Ton for the Warehousing for the next Seven Days; and the like Sum of One Penny and Two-pence respectively, per Ton, for every further Seven Days which such Articles shall remain upon such Quays, Wharfs, or Warehouses.

In 1829 the proprietors again applied for another act, entitled, 'An Act to alter, amend, and enlarge the Powers of an Act passed in the Sixth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, for making and maintaining the Duffryn Llynvi and Porth Cawl Railway, and other Works connected therewith,' in the preamble of which we learn, that the sum of £40,000 (being the amount of the estimate,) had been expended, and also the sum of £8,000, which last sum was all the money the company were enabled to raise of the £20,000 which the act of 6th George IV. empowered them to borrow by way of mortgage.

This last act is, therefore, chiefly obtained for the purpose of raising the remainder of the last-mentioned sum of £20,000, and to enable the company to admit mortgagees to become proprietors, to the amount of their respective claims upon the company.

The object of this railway is to open the extensive limestone and freestone quarries, and the numerous mines of iron-ore and coal, which abound in the immediate vicinity of its course.

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DULAIS RAILWAY.

7 George IV. Cap. 102, Royal Assent 26th May, 1826.

THIS railway, commencing at Aber Dulais, near the canal which crosses the River Neath at its junction with the Dulais River, runs parallel with the latter on the western bank, for nearly five miles, to Ynis-y-bout; at this place it crosses the river and keeps the eastern bank till it reaches the lime works of Cwm-Dulais. It is on one inclined plane of eight miles, five furlongs and five chains, from Aber Dulais to its termination, in which distance there is a rise of 426 feet. The survey and estimate, amounting to £8,730, were made by Mr. William Brough, civil engineer.

The act for executing this work is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway, or Tramroad, from or from near a certain place called Aber Dulais to or near to a certain other place called Cwm Dulais, both in the parish of Cadoxtone-Juxta-Neath, in the county of Glamorgan.'

The company, which consisted of fifteen persons, at the time the act was obtained, were incorporated under the name and style of "The Dulais Railway Company." They subscribed the sum of £10,000 which was divided into two hundred shares of £50 each, and power was granted to raise a further sum of £4,000, by way of mortgage of the rates. It is provided by the act that no more than three tons, including the weight of the carriage, shall be conveyed on this road in a waggon having two wheels, nor more than four tons, also including the weight of the carriage, in waggons having four wheels.

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Iron-stone, Iron-ore, Charcoal, Coal, Culm, Stone Coal, Coke, Cinders, Timber, Stone, Tiles, Bricks, Clay, Lime-stone, Lime and Manures l½d per Ton, per Mile.
For all Pig.iron 2½d. ditto. ditto.
For all Iron Castings 3d. ditto. ditto.
For all other Goods, Wares, Merchandise and other Things not before enumerated 4d. ditto. ditto.

Tolls to be taken for fractional Parts of a Ton or Mile.

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DUNDEE AND NEWTYLE RAILWAY.

7 George IV. Cap. 101, Royal Assent 26th May, 1826.

11 George IV. Cap. 60, Royal Assent 29th May, 1830.

THIS railway commences on the north side of the royal burgh and port of Dundee, whence it takes a northwardly course, through Stirlings Park, the parish of Mains, and across Bakers Brig Burn; thence, through the parish of Strathmartin, and over the water of Dighty, to within a short distance of Auchterhouse Castle; from whence it passes over a low part of the Sadley Hills, to the mill at Newtyle, where it terminates. It is in length eleven miles and a half; in the first six furlongs of which, from Dundee, it rises 84 feet 5 inches from the level of low water, spring tides; there is then an inclined plane seven hundred and three yards in length, rising 244 feet 4 inches, from the end of which it is continued level for the space of nearly four miles and three quarters; from whence another inclined plane extends sixteen hundred and ninety yards, and rises 200 feet; from the engine, placed on the top of this plane, it continues, for the distance of four miles and a furlong, with a rise of only 3 feet 9 inches; at this point another stationary engine is to be erected, and from whence, to its termination at Newtyle, there is another inclined plane one thousand and twenty-five yards in length, descending 244 feet 7 inches. Mr. C. Langdale designed and laid out this railway, and estimated the cost, including three steam engines of sufficient power to work the inclined planes, at the sum of £27,600. The first act for making it received the royal sanction on the 26th of May, 1826, and is entitled, 'An Act for making a Railway from the Royal Burgh and Port of Dundee, in the county of Forfar, to Newtyle, in the said county;' and by which the subscribers, eighteen in number, together with the magistrates and town council of Dundee, were incorporated by the name of" The Dundee and Newtyle Railway Company," and empowered to raise among themselves the sum of £30,000, in six hundred shares of £50 each; and, if necessary, a further sum of £10,000, on the credit of the undertaking.

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TONNAGE RATES.

For every Description of Goods, Wares, Merchandize, or other Things 6d per Ton, per Mile.
For each Passenger travelling in any Carriage upon the Railway 3d per Mile.

Fractions to be taken as for a Quarter of a Mile, and as for a Quarter of a Ton.

Land-owners may construct wharf and erect warehouses, for which the following rates are allowed.

WHARFAGE RATES.

Coal, Culm, Lime, Lime-stone, Clay, Iron-stone, Stone, Bricks, Gravel, Hay, Straw, Corn in the Straw, or Manure (remaining less than Six Months) ½d per Ton.
Iron, Lead-ore, or other Ore, Tin, Timber, Tiles, and Slates (ditto) ½d ditto.
For any other Goods, Wares, or Merchendize (ditto) 2d ditto.

ADDITIONAL WHARFAGE RATES,

To be paid by the Month, fsr such Articles as remain more than Six Days beyond the Period of Six Months, and so in Proportion for any less Time than a Month.
For the First Series of Articles as above enumerated ¼d per Ton, per Month.
For the Second List of enumerated Articles ½d ditto. ditto.
And for the Last 1d per Ton.

Seven years are allowed by the above-named act for the due execution of its provisions; and if the railway is not then finished, the power to do so will cease, except as to such part of it as may then be completed.

But the company of proprietors of this railway having raised and nearly expended all the money authorized to be raised under the authority of the 7th George IV. and their works being yet incomplete, applied to parliament last session for power to raise an additional sum; accordingly the royal assent was given on the 29th May last to an act, entitled, 'An Act to amend an Act for making a Railway from Dundee to Newtyle.' By this last act they are empowered to raise amongst themselves, or by the admission of new subscribers, in addition to the sum authorized by and under the act of 7th George IV. the further sum of £10,000, to be applied in the first place to paying the expense of obtaining this act, then in paying the sums borrowed under the former act, and afterwards in completing the necessary works; and such further sum is directed to be divided into shares of £50 each, to be consolidated with the original shares. The proprietors may also borrow the further sum of £20,000 over and above the sum of £10,000

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which the first recited act enables them to raise, and to pay off and again borrow, when necessary, any portion of the above sums; but the company are restrained from ever increasing their debt to more than £30,000 at one time.

For the purpose of facilitating the communication between the railway and the port of Dundee, the proprietors have authority to treat with the owners of property for a branch railway, upon which, this act empowers them to demand the same tonnage rates as upon the original line.

This railway will be very important to the mountainous district of country through which it passes, affording access to the port of Dundee, which heretofore seemed quite impracticable.

DUN RIVER NAVIGATION.

12 Geo. I. C. 38, R A. 24th May, 1726.

13 Geo. 1. C. 20, R. A. 24th Apr. 1727.

8 Geo. II. C. 9, It. A. 21st Mar, 1732.

13 Geo. II. C. 11, R. A. 19th Mar. 1739.

2 Geo. IV. C. 46, R. A. 7th May, 1821.

7 Geo. IV. C. 97, R. A. 28th May, 1826.

THE River Dun has its source near Saltersbrook, in the high moorlands which separate the counties of York and Chester, and pursues an eastwardly course by Thurlstone and Peniston, whence it takes a south-eastwardly direction by Huthwaite, and near to Wortley Hall, the residence of Lord Wharncliffe; its line from hence is through a deep and romantic dale, overhung by extensive woods; thence it passes the villages of Oughtibridge and Wadsley, to the town of Sheffield, on the north-east side of which it is joined by the River Sheaf. Its course hence is north-eastwardly by the village of Attercliff to Tinsley, where this navigation commences.

In describing the line of this navigation, we shall introduce the numerous cuts and improvements which the act of 7th George IV. enables the company to make, and which are now in progress.

This navigation begins in the Dun River, near the village of Tinsley, thence by the Tinsley Cut, which was made to avoid a bend in the river, under powers of the act of 12th George I.; and, at the distance of five furlongs it locks down into the river. The Dun is here the course of the navigation to the Ickles Cut, constructed under the powers of the above-recited act, upon the north side of the river, and which is something more than three furlongs in length. The river again becomes navigable to the Rotherham

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Cut, which cut runs parallel with the old river, and on its northern bank, for the length of a mile, where it locks down into the river at Eastwood; but, instead of this, a new canal is to be continued from Eastwood, along the north side of the river, to near Aldwark Mill, which is in length twelve hundred and twenty yards; the river from hence becomes the course of the navigation for a short distance, where another cut, of three hundred and seventy yards in length, is intended to be made, for the twofold purpose of avoiding a considerable bend in the river, and passing the mill; the Old Aldwark Cut will consequently be abandoned. From the east end of the intended cut at Aldwark, the navigation is continued for two miles in the old bed of the Dun; it then enters the Kilnhurst Cut, along which, and through Swinton and Mexbrough Cuts, it continues on the north side of the river, to near Mexbrough Church, where it again locks down into the Dun; but the canal is to be extended to the river, near the west end of the Denaby Cut, where the navigation is to be continued along the old line of the river as a canal, while a new channel, three hundred and sixty yards in length, is to be excavated for the river, between the present course and Denaby Cut. From the Dun, at Bull Green, a little above the east end of the last-mentioned old cut, a new canal is intended to be made along the north bank of the river, to a bend about a furlong west of the place where the Dearne River falls into the Dun. The length of the new cuts, from Mexbrough Church to the last-mentioned place, are two thousand two hundred and twenty yards. Hence the navigation is continued along the river, about half a furlong beyond the junction with the Dearne, to a place in the river called the Devil's Elbow, where a new river channel, one hundred and thirty yards in length, is to be opened. Hence the river is continued as the navigation to within half a furlong of Conisbrough Cut, which is to be abandoned, and a new canal, in lieu thereof, four hundred and forty yards in length, is intended to be made on the north side of the river and cut; from the end of which, the navigation continues in the river to near Sprotbrough Mills; but to pass which there is an old cut three furlongs in length. From Sprotbrough Cut, the navigation makes a considerable detour by Sprotbrough Hall, (the seat of Sir John Copley, Bart.) towards Balby, and by Hexthorpe and Newton, to Doncaster.

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The length of the navigation from Tinsley to Doncaster, by the old course, is twenty-one miles, and by the course as it is intended to be improved, it will be eighteen miles only, with a fall of 67 feet 6 inches, by eleven locks. From Doncaster Mill the course of the navigation is very circuitous to Milethorne, or Redcliffe Lock, where there is a short cut; thence passing by Wheatley (the residence of Sir W. B. Cooke, Bart.) in a crooked course to about midway between Wheatley and Long Sandall, where a new channel for the rivera nearly three furlongs in length, is directed to be made on the west side of the river, which shortens it considerably. The river is again the navigation to Long Sandall Cut, where it will be diverted to the west side of its present line, and the old bed of the river will become the continuation of the Kirk Sandall Cut, from Long Sandall Lock to the cut last-mentioned; thence taking a direct course to Barmby Dun, and across the low grounds to South Bramwith and Stainforth, a distance of five miles, where it locks down into the river, and also communicates with the Stainforth and Keadby Canal. From this point the river proceeds to Fishlake Ferry, from which place the navigation company have the power to charge dues. The navigation hence proceeds in an eastwardly course to Thorne Quay, whence it runs directly north, to New Bridge; it then proceeds eastwardly, and in nearly a straight line, until it enters the Ouze, at the port of Goole. From New Bridge, the original course of the Dun was by Turnbridge, to the River Aire, into which it entered about three quarters of a mile west of Rawcliffe; but, since its waters have been directed into the Dutch River, the ancient course has been suffered to silt up. The present line of the navigation, from New Bridge to Goole, was formerly two parallel drains, cut by Sir Cornelius Vermuueden, a Dutchman, in the beginning of the reign of Charles the First, for the purpose of draining the low lands in the vicinity of Hatfield Chase; and his successors, now called the participants, levy an acre-age rent upon the lands so benefited. A great flood happening about the year 1688, the sluices at Goole were carried away, and the tides having free access to these drains, they had the effect of destroying the division between them; so that as nothing but the outward banks remain, it assumes the appearance of a very wide canal, which, at high water, in spring tides, is

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navigable for brigs of three hundred tons burthen. There are three draw bridges over this part of the River Dun or Dutch River, which are kept in repair by the Dun Navigation Company, to whom a certain pontage is paid for every vessel passing through the same. The length of the navigation, from Doncaster Mills to Fishlake Ferry, which formerly was above twelve miles, is now reduced to ten miles and a quarter; and from thence to New Bridge, five miles and a half; from New Bridge to Goole, by the Dutch River, is five miles and a quarter. When the tide flows 15 feet at Goole, it will flow only 7 feet at Fishlake, and but 3½ at Barmby Dun Ford.

The total length of the navigation, from the River Ouze to Tinsley, when the improvements are completed, will only be thirty-nine miles, and the total rise, by sixteen locks, from low water mark in the Dutch River, is 92¼ feet; viz, from low water mark to the crown of Doncaster Mill Weir, 24¾ feet, by five locks; and from thence to the highest level on the navigation 67½ feet, by eleven locks.

This navigation is joined by the Sheffield Canal in Tinsley Cut; and, from the west end of the Ickles Cut on this navigation, a private canal, called the Holmes Goit, proceeds from it to Masbrough Iron Works. From the west end of the Old Rotherham Cut, there is another private canal, extending to the Greasborough Coal and Iron Works. In the side Cut of the Dun, near Swinton Pottery, the Dearne and Dove Canal forms a junction with this navigation; and, at Stainforth, the Stainforth and Keadby Canal proceeds from it.

The first parliamentary enactment relating to this navigation was in the 12th George I. and entitled, 'An Act for making the River Dun, in the West Riding of the county of York, navigable from Holmstile in Doncaster, up to the utmost extent of Tinsley, westward, a township within two miles of Sheffield;' by which the masters, wardens, searchers, assistants, and commonalty of the company of cutlers in Hallamshire, in the county of York, were appointed undertakers of the navigation, with power to make it navigable at their own expense, within the limits prescribed by the title of the act; by which also the following tonnage rates were allowed.

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Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
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