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This Book "Priestley's Navigable Rivers and Canals" by Joseph Priestley was previously published in April 1831. NOTE: Oringinally called "Historical Account of the Navigable Rivers, Canals, and Railways, of Great Britain".
For more information see About this Book

Index Page Link to Previous Page 39

TONNAGE RATES AND TOLLS.

. (*)
s. d.
(+)
s. d.
(±)
s. d.
(§)
s. d.
(II)
s. d.
From the Severn, near Tewkeabury, or any place between that and Strensham Sluice, to Stratford, or any place between that and Bidford 4 0 3 00 10 1 6 1 6
From the Severn, near Tewkesbury, or any place between that and Strensham Sluice, to Bidford, or any place between that and Evesham; or from Bidford, or any place between Evesham and Bidford, to or below Tewkesbury 3 4 2 4 0 8 1 6 1 3
From the Severn, near Tewkesbury, or any place between that and Strensham Sluice, to or below Evesham Sluice, and any place between that and Pershore 2 41 80 6 1 6 0 10
From the Severn, near Tewkesbury, or any place between that and Strensham Sluice, to Pershore Sluice, and any place between that and Nafford Sluice 1 8 1 40 51 3 0 8
From the Severn, near Tewkesbury, or any place between that and Strenaham Sluice, to Nafford Sluice, or any place between that and Strenaham Sluice 1 3 1 0 0 4 0 10 0 6
From the Severn, near Tewkesbury, or any place between that and Strensham Sluice, to Breedon, or to any place between the Severn, or Strenaham Sluice, provided the Vessel passes a Sluice 0 8 0 6 0 2 0 4 0 4
From Stratford, or any place between that and Bidford, to the Severn, near Tewkesbury, or any place between that and Strensham Sluice 4 0 3 0 0 10 1 6 1 6
From Stratford, or any place between that and Bidford, to Strensham Sluice, or any place between that and Nafford Sluice 3 8 2 9 0 9 1 4 1 4
From Stratford, or any place between that and Bidford, to Nafford Sluice, or any place between that and Pershore Sluice 3 4 2 6 0 8 1 3 1 3
From Stratford, or any place between that and Bidford, to Pershore Sluice, or any place between that and Chadbury Mill, or Sluice 3 0 2 3 0 7 1 1 1 0
From Stratford, or any place between that and Bidford, to Chadbury Mill, or Sluice, and anyplace between that and Harvington Mill 2 0 1 8 0 6 0 10 0 9
From Stratford, or any place between that and Bidford, to Harvington Mill, and anyplace between that and Bidförd 1 0 0 100 30 50 5
From Stratford, to Bidford, or any place between Bidford or Stratford 0 8 0 6 0 2 0 3 0 3
From Eveaham, to Tewkesbury, or the Severn, or to Stratford, or any place between the Severn, or Tewkesbury, and Strensham Sluice; or Stratford, and Luddington Sluice 2 4 1 80 61 60 9
From Evesham, to Strensham Sluice, or Cleeve, or to any place between Strensham Sluice, and Pershore Sluice, or Cleeve, and Bidford 1 81 40 40 80 6
From Evesham, to Bidford, or Pershore, and to any place between Bidiord, and Harvington Mill, or Fladbury, and Pershore 1 41 00 30 60 5
From Evesham, to Harvington Mill, or Fladbury 1 00 100 30 50 4
From Evesham, to any place between Harvington Mill, or Fladbury, provided such Vessel passes a Sluice 0 80 60 20 30 3

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For all Goods taken on board at any place between Tewkesbury and Stratford, and unladen before they come to Stratford or Tewkesbury, for which no provision is herein made, the same Eates are hereby fixed from the Place where they are taken on board to Evesham, and from Evesham to the Place where the same shall belanded or unladen, and so in proportion for any greater or less Quantity.

Millers, on the Avon, in consideration of the inconvenience they occasionally sustain, by having to draw off the Water, for the purpose of repairing Sluices, &c. are exempted from Payment of Toll, upon Coals used by their Mills, or for Materials used for Repairs of the same; but if they prefer paying Tonnage, they are entitled to Twenty Shillings per Day, for drawing off Water and during such time the Water is drawn off.

Until the expenses of this act was paid, the extra toll of two shillings and sixpence, for each loaded vessel, was paid at Tewkesbury, Pershore, Eveshain, or Stratford, or such other place as the vessel passed through.

This valuable property belonged, originally, to George Perrott, Esq. but it was placed in the hands of trustees, under powers of an act, entitled, 'An Act for vesting the Navigation of the River Avon, in the counties of Warwick, Worcester, and Gloucester, &c. and certain other Estates, late the Property of George Perrott, Esq. in Trustees, &c.' but the tolls and duties remain, as settled by the act of the 24th George II.

This river is of infinite advantage to the towns of Pershore, Evesham, and Stratford, and the country adjacent, supplying them with coal and merchandize, and serving to export their surplus agricultural produce.

AVON AND FROME RIVERS.

11 & 12 Wil. III. C. 23, R. A. llth May, 1700.

22 Geo. II. C. 20,11. A. 26th May, 1749.

43 Geo. III. C. 140, R. A. l1th August, 1803.

46 Geo. III. C. - R. A. 23rd May, 1806.

47 Geo. III. C. 33, R. A. 1st August, 1807.

48 Geo. III. C. 3,11. A. 21st Mar. 1808.

49 Geo. III C. 17, R A. 28th April, 1809.

Though the first act relating to the navigation of these rivers occurs in the reign of William the Third, and is entitled, 'An Act for the better preserving the Navigation of the Rivers Avon and Frome, and for cleansing, paving and enlightening the Streets of the city of Bristol,' yet for several hundred years previous, this river, front the western end of the Avon River Navigation, at Hanham Mills, to the River Severn, King Road, has been, by ancient charters and grants from the crown, in the possession of the mayor, burgesses and commonalty of the city of Bristol, as Conservators thereof, and they have, from time immemorial, -

page 42

received rates for wharfage, anchorage, moorage, &c. but as these have been but indifferently defined, several acts of parliament have been obtained for the determining the same, and for other purposes set forth in the respective titles, which will be briefly noticed in their place. The course of that part of the Avon under the jurisdiction of the corporation of Bristol, commencing at Hanham Mills, is in a westerly direction by Crew's Hole, thence skirting the south side of the city of Bristol, through the parish of Bedminster to Redcliffe; thence by Roundham Lodge and Abbots Leigh Park, to the River Severn at King Road. From Hanham Mills to King Road, is in length fifteen miles and a half. Its course formerly lay through the heart of the city, but a new channel for the river has been cut on the south side of Bristol, two miles in length, while the ancient course has been converted into an excellent floating-dock and harbour, which is productive of immense advantages to the commercial population of this enterprizing city.

The River Frome is but a small stream, which rising near the town of Wickwar, in Gloucestershire, passes Iron Acton, and, in its course by Stoke Gifford House, supplies a number of mills and manufactories. It enters on the north side of Bristol, and passing through the centre of the city, falls into the floating-dock, or ancient course of the Avon. The last half mile of its course is used as a dock and harbour, (no other portion being navigable,) and as it is in the very heart of the city, its value may be easily appreciated.

In the year 1749, the corporation obtained an act, entitled, 'An Act for making more effectual an Act passed in the Eleventh and Twelfth Years of the Reign of his late Majesty King William the Third, for the better preserving the Navigation of the Rivers Avon and Frome, &c.;' but we forbear to enlarge upon the provisions of this act, as the rates of wharfage, anchorage, &c. were not finally ascertained and settled until 1807, when parliamentary sanction was given to an act, entitled, 'An Act for ascertaining and establishing the Rates of Wharfage, Cannage, Plankage, Anchorage and Moorage, to be received at the lawful Quays in the Port of Bristol;for the regulation of the Cranekeepers in the said Port; and for the better regulation of Pilots and Pilotage of Vessels navigating the Bristol Channel.'

page 43

Under this act the powers granted to the mayor, burgesses and commonalty, by charter, grants from the crown and preceding acts of parliament, are set forth; in which it appears they have jurisdiction down the Severn and Bristol Channel, to the two small islands called the Stipe Holmes and the Flat Holmes, distant from the mouth of the Avon about twenty-three miles; and that they and their lessees are also possessed of all the lawful wharfs and quays in the city and port of Bristol.

RATES OF ANCHORAGE AND MOORAGE.

All coasting Vessels from Ports to the Westward of the Holmes not exceeding Forty Tons Burthen 0s 9d each Voyage.
All Coasting Vessels, ditto, at and above Forty Tons 1s 6d ditto.
. ANCHORAGE. MOORAGE.
All Vessels (except Coasting Vessels) under Thirty Tons 2s 6d each, ½d per Ton.
All Vessels, above Thirty Tons, and under One Hundred Tons 5 0d each, ½d ditto.
All Vessels above One Hundred Tons 5 0d each, 1d ditto.

The rates of wharfage, carmage and plankage, are fixed and very particularly enumerated in the first schedule of this act, but as they are arranged under upwards of four hundred heads, our limits will not permit us to do more than refer our readers to the act. Also by the act separate rates are fixed for the landing or shipping, and landing and weighing of goods, wares and merchandize, which are particularly set forth in the second scl;edule of this act, to which we likewise refer the reader; but the charges in the latter schedule are subject to the control of the magistrates assembled in quarter sessions, who can reduce the rates.

By an act of the 43rd George III. entitled, 'An Act for improving and rendering more commodious the Port and Harbour of Bristol,' the mayor, burgesses and commonalty of the city of Bristol; and their successors; the master, wardens and commonalty of merchant venturers of the said city, and their successors, and several other persons were incorporated by the name and style of " The Bristol Dock Company," and were empowered to raise among themselves £250,000, in shares of £100 each; and a further sum of £50,000 to be borrowed on the credit of the rates and duties, for the purpose of improving the docks and harbour of Bristol, and for making a canal or entrance-basin in Rownham Mead, to the extent of six acres, with other works therein specified.

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But in the preamble of an act which the company obtained in 1806, entitled, 'An Act to alter and amend an Act passed in the Forty_third Year of his present Majesty, entitled, An Act for improving and rendering more commodious the Port and Harbour of Bristol, and for extending the Powers and Provisions of the said Act,' it appears that of the £250,000 authorized to be raised among themselves, they only obtained £235,000, and were wholly unable to obtain any part of the £50,000 which they were authorized to borrow on mortgage. This act, therefore, gives power to the directors nominated for managing the affairs of the Bristol Dock Company, or any five of them, to make a call of £35 per cent. on original shares, (which would increase the capital to £317,250,) to enable them to carry into execution the works recited in the act of 43rd George III. with the alterations and imnprovements authorized to be made by the last recited act.

The works authorized to be done under the act of 46th George III. consist chiefly of a solid dam across the River Avon, at the Red Cliff, and another between the present course of the Avon, (now the floating-dock,) and the new intended course of the said river; also another dam over the Avon at Totterdown, and for making the westwardmost locks in the Rownham Mead Basin 33 feet wide, instead of 45 and 33 feet.

The power in the act of 43rd Geo. III. to borrow £50,000 on mortgage, is repealed by the above recited act. Persons holding ten shares in this undertaking, are qualified to serve as directors.

Two other acts have been obtained by the Bristol Dock Company, one in the 48th George III. emmtitled, 'An Act for completing the Improvements of the Port of Bristol;' and another in the following year, entitled, 'An Act to enable the Bristol Dock Company to borrow a further Sum of Money for completing the Improvements of the Port and Harbour of Bristol;' but as they refer to matters which are not strictly within the limits of this work, we refrain from quoting the provisions of the same.

The River Avon, by reason of the gradual contraction of the channel of the Severn, is subject to very high and rapid tides, and particularly so when the wind is from the west, or a point or two to time south. At the mouth of the Avon, wimere the Severn is six miles wide, the usual spring tide is 40 feet; but in November,

page 45

1813, the spring tide there was ascertained by Captain Andrew Livingstone, of Glasgow, to be full 50 feet perpendicular rise. At Chepstow, situate upon the mouth of the River Wye, (where the channel of the Severn is little more titan two miles wide,) the vertical rise of time spring tide is often 60 feet.

As the River Avon is the first link of one of the chains of the present inland communication between the ports of Bristol and London, this circumstance alone gives to it an importance that in former times it had no claim to; and if ever the scheme, which is now in agitation, for making a canal between these two important places, capable of admitting ships of upwards of four hundred tons burthen, (the estimated expense of which is eight millions,) be carried into execution, this river will doubtless form an interesting portion of such a navigation.

The celebrated Smeaton reported on the proposed floating harbour, docks, &c. so long ago as the year 1765; but William Jessop, Esq. was the engineer who carried into execution the works required under the authority of the last act of parliament.

AVON RIVER.

10 Anne, Cap. 8, Royal Assent 22nd May, 1712.

47 George III Cap. 129, Royal Assent 14th August, 1807.

51 George III Cap. 167, Royal Assent 15th June, 1811.

THIS is a continuation of the same River Avon as mentioned above; but was made navigable to Bath, by different parties, and under separate authorities. The source of the River Avon is at a short distance west of Badminton Park, the seat of the Duke of Beaufort, in the county of Gloucester, and after meandering through these beautiful grounds, enters Wiltshire, taking a northerly direction close to the town of Malmsbury, and thence westward to Dauntsey, a seat of the late Earl of Peterborough, where, changing for the south, it passes Christian Malford, winding to within a little distance of Bowood, the seat of the Marquis of Lansdowne; thence to the town of Chippenham, to which place, a branch of the Wilts and Berks Canal is carried. In its course it runs by Lackham House, and Laycock Abbey, to the west of the town of Melksham; thence to the town of Bradford, a little below which,

page 46

at Avon Cliff Aqueduct, it is crossed by the Kennet and Avon Canal; and again, a mile north-west of Monckton Combe, by another aqueduct, called Dundas Aqueduct; from whence, it takes a circuitous route to Bath, at which place it becomes navigable, and continues so through Bristol, to the Severn. The Kennet and Avon Canal locks into the River Avon, at Bath, and the proprietors, under the above acts, have jurisdiction only from the city of Bath to Hanham Mills, the length being eleven miles, with a fall of 30 feet, by six locks.

The river, from Bath, to the tideway at Hanham Mills, was made navigable by certain commissioners, who were appointed by the mayor, aldermen, and common council of the city of Bath, under powers granted them by an act of the 10th of Anne, entitled, 'An Act for making the River Avon, in the counties of Somerset and Gloucester, navigable, from the city of Bath, to or near Hanham Mills.' The commissioners were thirty-three in number, and amongst them were his Grace the Duke of Beaufort, the Marquis of Worcester, Timothy Goodwin, Bishop of Kilmore and Ardaugh, and Lord Noel. The deed of appointment bears date the 11th of March, 1724.

Until 1813, the barges were towed on this navigation, by men only, in consequence of having neglected, in the act of Anne, to secure a horse towing-path along the banks. The proprietors, (entitled, "The Proprietors of the Tolls arising from the Navigation "of the River Avon,") consisting of the Company of Proprietors of the Kennet and Avon Canal Navigation, Sir C. Willoughby, Bart. and ten other persons, found it desirable that such powers should be obtained; they, therefore, applied to parliament, in 1807, and obtained an act, which is entitled, 'An Act for enabling the Proprietors of the Navigation of the River Avon, in the counties of Somerset and Gloucester, from the city of Bath, to or near Hanham Mills, to make and maintain a Horse Towing-Path, for the Purpose of towing and haling, with Horses or otherwise, Boats, Lighters, or other Vessels, up and down the said River.' Under this act, ten commissioners were added to those appointed under the former act, but the tolls remain unaltered.

Four years after this act of the legislature, (in 1811) a company, consisting of two hundred and eighty-three persons, many

page 47

of whom were proprietors of the Kennet and Avon Canal, obtained an act, for making a canal between the cities of Bath and Bristol, which was entitled, 'An Act for making a navigable Canal between the cities of Bath and Bristol; and also for supplying with Water the Inhabitants of the city of Bristol and its neighbourhood.'

This canal was to commence at the end of the Kennet and Avon Canal, at Bath, and to run parallel with the River Avon, on its southern bank, to the town of Keynshamn, where the line crosses to the opposite bank; thence, running parallel to Crew's Hole, it leaves the river, and crosses the upper end of Pyle Marsh to Old Market Street, in the city of Bristol, and from whence there was to be a short cut, locking down into the Ba'istol Dock, or Floating Harbour. The length would be about thirteen miles.

The company were incorporated by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Bath and Bristol Canal, and Bristol Water Works," and empowered to raise, anmong themselves, £500,000, to be divided into five thousand shares of £100 each, with further power to contribute, among themselves, £1 50,000, or to borrow the same sum by mortgage of the tolls.

The estimate for the canal and water works, which was made by John Rennie, Esq. F.R.S. amounted to £453,530, of which, £343,030 related to the canal; and it appears that £365,400 was subscribed before going to parliament.

As no portion of this canal has been executed, nor is ever likely to be, under the powers granted by the above recited act, it is unnecessary to introduce the rates that were allowed by the same. The Kennet and Avon Canal Company acted judiciously in purchasing the principal part of the shares in the River Avon; for by obtaining the management of the river, they have been - enabled to secure a better navigation to the public, and to themselves ample remuneration. Time parliamentary rates are as follows.

TONNAGE RATES.

The Rates allowed by the Act, 10th Anne, are Five Shillings per Ton, on all Kinds of lading, for the whole Distance, and for every Passenger, for the whole Distance, Sixpence; but the Company have considerably reduced the Rates, which vary according to the Articles of lading.

page 48

AVON AND GLOUCESTERSHIRE RAILWAY.

9 George lV. Cap. 94, Royal Assent 19th June, 1828.

This railway commences from the River Avon, below the town of Keynsham, whence it takes a northerly course by Willsbridge, Haul Lane Coal Works and Warmley, to the Bristol and Gloucestershire Railway, at Rodway Hill, in the parish of Mangotsfield, where it terminates.

It is in length five miles, two furlongs and four chains, with a total rise, from the level of the Avon, below the tail of Keynsham Lock, (which is 2 feet above the Bristol Floating Harbour), of 198 feet, viz, from the Avon, an inclined plane three thousand three hundred and sixty-six yards in length, rising 124 feet; another three thousand three hundred and forty-four yards in length, with a rise of 19 feet only; while the remainder of the railway, which is two thousand six hundred and eighteen yards, has a rise of 55 feet. The estimate for this undertaking was made by Mr. John Biackwell, and amounts to the sum of £20,226, 11s. 2d. The act for making it is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway or Tramroad from Rodway Hill, in the parish of Mangotsfield, in the county of Gloucester, to the River Avon, in the parish of Bitton, in the same county.'

The subscribers, at the time the act was obtained, were ten in number, together with the Proprietors of the Rennet and Avon Canal Navigation, who alone subscribed £10,000; and £12,000 were subscribed by the others. The act incorporates these parties by the name of "The Avon and Gloucestershire Railway Company," with power to raise, amongst themselves, the sum of £21,000, in two hundred and ten shares, of £100 each and, if necessary, a further sum of £10,000 on mortgage of the undertaking.

TONNAGE RATES.

For every Description of Goods 2d. per Ton, per Mile.
.

Fractions as for a Quarter of a Ton, and as for a Quarter of a Mile.

Owners of lands may make branches to communicate with this railway, and may erect wharfs, and demand the following rates.

page 49

WAREHOUSING AND WHARFAGE RATES.

For the Wharfage of all Coal, Culm, Lime, Lime-stone, Clay, Iron, Iron-stone, Iron-ore, Lead-ore or any other Ores, Timber, Stone, Bricks, Tiles, Slate, Gravel or other Things 2d per Ton.
For the Warehousing of every Package not exceeding Fifty-six Pounds 2d.
Ditto above Three Hundred Pounds, and not exceeding Six Hundred Pounds 4d.
Ditto exceeding One Thousand Pounds 6d.

Should any Goods or other Articles remain longer than Fourteen Days, a further Sum of One Penny per Ton for Wharfage, and Two-pence per Ton for warehousing the same for the next Three Days, and the like Sum of One Penny and Two-pence respectively, for every succeeding Three Days which the same remain on the Wharfs or Warehouses.

CRANAGE RATES.

For any Weight under Two Tons with one Lift of the Crane 0s 6d per Ton.
Ditto of Two Tons, and less than Three Tons, ditto 1s 0d ditto.
Ditto of Three Tons, and less than Four Tons, ditto 1s 6d ditto.

And so progressively advancing Sixpence per Ton.

The object of this railway is to open more beneficially the very extensive collieries and stone quarries which abound on the line, at Coal Pit Heath, and other places in the parishes of Westerleigh, Pucklechurch, and Mangotsfield.

The coal brought down this railway to the River Avon, will find its way, by the Rennet and Avon and the Wilts and Berks Canals, through the counties of Wiltshire and Berkshire, and even down the Thames to Reading, Maidenhead and Windsor.

AXE RIVER.

42 George Ill. Cap. 58, Royal Assent 24th May, 1802.

THE River Axe has its rise about a mile West of the city of Wells, in Somersetshire, whence, running westward by Wookey, and across the level of Cluer, to the village of Lower Weare, two miles west of Axbridge, and thence by Loxton and Bleadon to Uphill, it falls into the Bristol Channel in Uphill Bay.

Previous to 1802, the Axe was a very indifferent navigation, as a tideway river, to the village of Lower Weare, situate on the high road leading from Bridgewater to Axbridge; but in consequence of the spring tides rising in the Bristol Channel to the height of 40 feet, and there being no locks or sluices on the course to check the advance of the tides, the low lands on its banks were

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frequently overflowed and rendered useless for agricultural purposes. Application was therefore made to parliament for powers enabling the proprietors of lands to improve the drainage of the same, and tp make the navigation more efficient; an act accordingly was obtained on the day above quoted, entitled, 'An Act for draining, preserving from Water, and improving, certain Low Lands and Grounds, lying within the several parishes, or chapelries, of Wookey, Westbury, Rodney-Stoke, Wedmore, Mear, Weare, Nyland, Badgworth, Biddisham, East Brent, South Brent, Cheddar, Axbridge, Compton Bishop, Loxton, Bleadon, Brean, Berrow, and Lympsham, all In the county of Somerset; and for altering and improving the Navigation of the River Axe, within the said parishes of Bleadon, Lympsham, Loxton, East Brent, Compton Bishop, Biddisham, Badgworth, Weare, and Axbridge, some or one of them, above and from a certain place called Southern Mead Bars, situate within the said parish of Bleadon.' By this act, the execution of the works proposed, was entrusted to three commissioners, who were authorized to raise £15,000, on mortgage of the rates and assessments which they were empowered to collect, for the purposes of the act, from owners of lands that were benefited by the drainage; and for their trouble, in executing the trust, a salary of three guineas a-day each was also granted them. Their power extended to four years and six months beyond the time required for the execution of the works, and after that, the navigation and drainage were to be vested in the commissioners of sewers for the county of Somerset.

In the execution of the above works, the commissioners have shortened the navigation by making two cuts, one of which, near Loxton, is above a mile in length. They have also constructed a lock, near Southern Mead Bars, which is the only one upon the river. The navigation, by this act, is free of toll. It extends to the village of Lower Weare, near Axbridge, and from its head, to its fall into the Bristol Channel, is nine miles in length.

The line of the proposed Bristol and Taunton Canal crosses this river, near the village of Loxton, and from whence, a branch was laid out to extend to Cheddar, but this part of that projected canal, together with the above-mentioned branch, is now abandoned.

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BALLOCHNEY RAILWAY.

7 George IV. Cap. 48, Royal Assent 5th May, 1826.

This railway commences from the Kipps, or Kippbyres Colliery Branch of the Monkland and Kirkintilloch Railway, one mile and a half west of the town of Airdrie, in Lanarkshire, and proceeding by Lea-end Colliery to the north of Airdrie, it passes by Stanrig to the march or division between east and west Arbuckle, in the parish of New Monkland, where the main line terminates. The whole length of the main line is four miles, with a rise, from the Kirkintilloch Railroad, of 352 feet, to Arbuckle. At one mile and three quarters from the west end of the railway there is a branch to Brownside and Blackrig Coal Pits, near the village of Clerkston, and called the Clerkston Branch, of one mile and a quarter in length. Also from the main line another branch called the Whiterig Branch, the length of which is three quarters of a mile. At a distance of nearly a mile from Kippbyres there is a self-acting inclined plane of more than three quarters of a mile in length, and upon the remaining part of this railway the inclinations are such that locomotive machines may be employed very advantageously. The total length of the main line and branches is a little more than six miles. The original estimate was made by Mr. Thomas Grainger, civil engineer, in 1826, and amounted to £18,431, 19s.

The act for making this railway and branches is entitled, 'An Act for making a Railway from Arbuckle and Ballochney, in time parish of New Monkland, in the county of Lanark, to or near the termination of the Monkland and Kirkintilloch Railway, at Kipps, or Kippbyres, also in the said parish of New Monkland and county of Lanark.' The subscribers to this railway, at the time the act was obtained, consisted of fourteen persons, and were incorporated under the name and style of "The Ballochney Railway Company." They were empowered to raise by subscription £18,425, to be divided into seven hundred and thirty-seven shares of £25 each.

By section 32, the company were, in addition to the sum of

page 52

£18,425, empowered to borrow any sum not exceeding £10,000, on assignment of the property of the said undertaking, and of the rates authorized to be collected, repayable with interest.

TONNAGE RATES.

For all Goods, Wares, Merchandize, Coal and other Things 0s 3d per Ton, per Mile.
For passing up or down any one of the Inclined Planes, or any part of one, and for every Inclined Plane 6d in addition.

Tolls to be paid for a fractional part of a Mile, and for a fractional part of a Ton, and no Fractions of a Mile to be considered less than a Quarter.

The period allowed by the act for the execution of this railway is five years; after that time the power to cease, excepting on that part of the railway which may have been completed. Abundance of coal and ironstone are worked in the immediate neighbourhood of this railroad, by which, by the Monkland Canal, and the Garnkirk and Glasgow Railroad, ready communications are opened with the populous city of Glasgow, which is at the distance of only fifteen miles.

BARNSLEY CANAL.

33 George III. Cap. 110, Royal Assent 3rd June, 1793.

48 George III. Cap. 13, Royal Assent 28th March, 1808.

This canal commences from the River Calder (the Aire and Calder Navigation) three quarters of a mile below Wakefield Bridge, and about three-eighths of a mile below the junction of the Calder and Hebble Navigation, at Fall Ing Lock, with the above-mentioned navigation; from thence, proceeding in a southerly direction, it passes Walton Hall, the seat of the ancient family of the Watertons, to which place there is a rise, from the Calder, of 117 feet, by fifteen locks, in the distance of two miles and three quarters. From Walton Hall the canal is level through Haw Park Wood, where there is a feeder, communicating with Hiendicy Reservoir, which reservoir was made expressly for the purpose of supplying this canal. This is situate half-a-mile to the eastward, and originally occupied eighty acres, but the head of the reservoir has since been raised 4 feet, and it now covers a surface of one hundred and twenty-seven acres, the greatest depth being 40 feet. A powerful engine is erected here for the purpose of lifting water

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from the canal into the reservoir, when the long level is full, being the principal means of supplying the reservoir with water; and in droughty seasons it is readmitted by means of sluices. From Haw Park Wood, the canal continues its course, on a level, by Roy stone, Carlton, and Burton, near Which latter place, it crosses the River Dearne by an aqueduct of stone, of five arches, of 30 feet span each; at the south side of which, and at a distance of ten miles from its commencement at the Calder, it forms a junction with the Dearne and Dove Canal. From the aqueduct, the canal takes a westwardly course, on the same level, parallel with the Dearne, crossing the London Road within half-a-mile of the town of Barnsley; from thence, by Gawber Hall Collieries, to near Barugh Mill, where the long level of the canal terminates, having extended eleven miles. From this place, to the end of the canal at Bamby Basin, there is a rise of 40 feet, by five locks; the water, for the supply of which lockage, is, in a time of scarcity, lifted by a steam engine, from the long level, to which place there is a drift, nearly a quarter of a mile in length, but this is only used when the stream supplying Barugh Mill is very low. The length of the canal is fiteen miles and an eighth, and the act for making it was passed in the 33rd George III. and entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal, from the River Calder, in the township of Warmfield-cum-Heath, to or near time town of Barnsley; and from thence to Barnby Bridge, In the township of Cawthorne, in the West Riding of the county of York; and certain Railways and , other Roads to communicate therewith.'

The subscribers to this work were incorporated by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Barnsley Canal Navigation," and consisted of one hundred and thirteen persons, among whom were the Duke of Leeds, Lord Hawke, the Countess Dowager of Bute, the Earl of Wigtoun, seven baronets, and almost all the landholders in its immediate vicinity.

They were empowered to raise among themselves £72,000, in seven hundred and twenty shares of £100 each, with power to raise a further sum, not exceeding £20,000, either among themselves or by mortgage of the rates.

In this act, permission is given to the Calder and Hebble Navigation Company, and Thomas Richard Beaumont, Esq. to make a

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navigable communication between the Calder, at Horbury Pasture, and the Barnsley Canal, at Barugh Mill, the length of which would be six miles, and the estimate, amounting to £72,115, was made by the late Mr. Jessop, Mr. Elias Wright, and Mr. Gott, the engineers employed on the Barnsley Canal; but no part of this canal has ever been executed.

THE RATES OF TONNAGE ALLOWED UNDER THIS ACT.

Wheat, Shelling, Beans, Peas, Vetches and Lentils, Rape, Line, Cole and Mustard Seed, Apples, Pears, Onions and Potatoes 8d per Quarter for the whole Length.
Barley 5d ditto, ditto.
Oats and Malt 4d ditto, ditto.
Pack or Sheet of Wool, Dried Pelts or Spetches 6d per 312lbs. ditto.
Coal, Slack, Cinders, Culm, Charcoal and Lime 1d per Ton, per Mile.
Limestone ¾d ditto. ditto.
Stone, Iron-stone, Flag, Paving-stone and Slate 1d ditto, ditto.
Pig or Old Iron 1½d ditto. ditto.
Cast Metal Goods and Bar Iron 2d ditto, ditto.
English Oak, Timber and Planks 1½d per Forty Cubical Feet, per Mile.
Elm, Oak and other English Timber 1½d per Fifty Cubical Feet, per Mile.
Fir, and all other kinds of Foreign Timber 1½d ditto, ditto.
Deals and Battens, equal to Thirty Deals, of 12 feet long, 3 inches thick, and from 9 to l2 inches broad 1½d per Mile.
All other things not before enumerated 2 per Ton, per Mile.

That Ten superficial Yards of Flag Paving-stone, from One Inch to Two Inches and three-quarters in Thickness, or Sixteen Cubical Feet of Stone, to be deemed a Ton.

The only railway belonging to this company, made under the authority of the before-mentioned act, is from Barnby Basin to Norcroft Bridge, near the Silkstone Collieries, and is one mile and a quarter in length.

TONNAGE RATES ON THE RAILWAY.

Coal and other Minerals 3d. per Ton, per Mile.

From the preamble of a second act, passed in the 48th George III. and entitled, 'An Act for amending and enlarging the Powers of an 4ct of his present Majesty, for making and maintaining the Barnsley Canal Navigation, and certain Railways and other Roads to communicate therewith; and for increasing the Rates, Tolls, and Duties, thereby granted,' it appears that the company had expended the sum of £97,000, authorized to be raised under the preceding act, in the canal alone, and had incurred sundry debts; they, therefore, obtained power to raise the futher sum of £43,200, by a call of £60 on every shareholder of £100 each,

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and they were further empowered to raise £10,000 on mortgage, if the former sum should not be sufficient. By this act the rates of tonnage are increased one half, excepting on that part of the navigation extending from the junction with the Dearne and Dove Canal at the aqueduct, to Barnby Basin, for vessels which come out of, or enter, the Dearne and Dove Canal, or on the railways connected, or that may be connected with this portion of the Barnsley Canal. An exception to the additional charge is also made on all flag, paving-stone, lime-stone, or lime, navigating on this part of the canal, which shall previously have been navigated on the Deame and Dove CanaL

This canal was projected principally with the view of opening the very valuable and extensive coal fields in the neighbourhood of Barnsley and Silkstone, and its execution has had the effect of introducing the coal, worked in the latter place, into the London Market, where it holds a distinguished place among the Yorkshire Coals. The making of this canal has also been of incalculable advantage to the agriculturists in its vicinity, by the facility it gives to the introduction of Knottingley Lime; but it has been more particularly experienced by those who are employed in bringing into cultivation the vast tracts of moor land lying to the north and west of its termination at Bamby Basin. The depth of this canal is 5 feet, the width of the locks 15 feet, and the length 66 feet.

When the second act was obtained, authorizing the advance of £60 for every £100 share, it was deemed so unpropitious as to induce a many original subscribers to dispose of their shares, at the rate of £5 each, after having advanced the whole amount authorized to be raised by the first act, and these shares are now (1829) valued at £325 per share.

The canal was opened on the 8th of June, 1799, but the railroad to Silkstone was not commenced until after the passing of the act of 48th George III.

BASINGSTOKE CANAL.

18 George III. Cap. 75, Royal Assent 15th May, 1778.

33 George III. Cap. 16, Royal Assent 28th March, 1793.

THIS canal commences from the navigable River Wey, one mile and three quarters south from the village of Weybridge, and

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about three miles from its junction with the River Thames. Its course from hence is south-west, passing Horsell, and Pirbright, to Frimley Wharf, whence it takes a southerly course to near the village of Ash, where it crosses the little River Blackwater, and enters the county of Southampton. To this point of the canal it is fifteen miles, and there is a rise, from the River Wey, of 195 feet, by twenty_nine equal locks. This part of the canal is 36 feet wide, and 4½ feet deep, and the locks admit vessels 72 feet long, and 13 feet wide, carrying fifty tons. From this point it is level to Basingstoke, a distance of twenty-two miles.

In its course from Ash Valley, at a distance of two miles, it crosses the mail road from London to Winchester; and about a mile from hence, westward, the canal is carried across a valley of three quarters of a mile in breadth, by a very fine aqueduct; from hence it proceeds westward, passing Dogmersfield House, and close to the town of Odiham, to Grewell, where the canal enters Grewell Hill Tunnel, half-a-mile and one-eighth in length, and from which, being entirely in chalk, which yields vast quantities of water, the principal supply is obtained for lockage, &c. From hence, the canal proceeds, passing Old Basing, to the town of Basingstoke, where it terminates. The summit level of the canal, of twenty-two miles, is 38 feet wide, and 5½ feet deep, and the total length is thirty-seven miles.

There is a reservoir, at Aldershot, for the supply of this canal, which was completed in 1796; and also a feeder from the River Lodden.

This canal was made under the authority of an act, entitled, 'An Act for making a navigable Canal, from the town of Basingstoke, in the county of Southampton, to communicate with the River Wey, in the parish of Chertsey, in the county of Surrey, and to the South-East Side of the Turnpike-Road, in the parish of Turgiss, in the said county of Southampton,' and the subscribers, consisting of thirty-three persons, (amongst whom were the Earl of Worthington, the Earl of Dartmouth, the Earl of Portsmouth, and Lord Rivers), were incorporated by the name of "The Company of Proprietors of the Basingstoke Canal Navigation." They were empowered 'to raise among themselves £86,000, in eight hundred and sixty shares of £100 each, with

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further power to raise a further sum of £40,000, if necessary. The affairs of the company are managed by twenty proprietors, who form a committee, and who are under the control of the general meetings of the company.

TONNAGE RATES.

Lime, Lime-stone, Paving-stone, Chalk, Dung, Soil, Marl and other Manure for Land 1d per Ton per Mile
For all Goods, Wares and Merchandize, and other Things 2d ditto, ditto.

Gravel, Sand and other Materials for Roads, (except Paving-stones) are exempt from payment of Toll, when the Water is running through the Gauge, Paddle or Niche of the Lock.

Vessels not to exceed Thirteen Feet in Breadth, and Seventy-two Feet in Length; and Vessels of less Burthen than Fifteen Tons, shall not pass through any Lock with out leave.

In this act, the proprietors of the navigation of the River Wey agree to receive only one shilling per ton for all descriptions of merchandize, &c. passing on the Wey River, between this canal and the Thames; and they further agree to keep their locks of the length of 81 feet, and 14 feet wide.

By an act of the 33rd George III. entitled, 'An Act for effectually carrying into Execution an Act of Parliament of the Eighteenth Year of his present Majesty, for making a navigable Canal from the town of Basingstohe, in the county of Southampton, to communicate with the River Wey, in the parish of Chertsey, in the county of Surrey, and to the South-East Side of the Turnpike-Road, in the parish of Turgiss, in the said county of Southampton,' it is stated that the sum of £126,000, authorized to be raised by the preceding act, is all expended; that their works are not completed, and that they have incurred some debt: they area therefore, empowered to raise, upon loans or annuities, on mortgage of the tolls, the further sum of £60,000, with which sum they were enabled to finish their works, which were opened in 1796.

The trade upon this canal consists chiefly of coals, deals, groceries, bale goods, &c. from London; and the exports are timber, flour, malt, bark, and earthenware.

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BAYBRIDGE CANAL.

6 George IV. Cap. 164, Royal Assent 22nd June, 1825.

This canal proceeds from Binesbridge, in the parish of West Grinstead, where the navigation of the River Arun commences, and keeps the course of the unnavigable part of the Arun, to Baybridge, where it terminates. It is in length three miles and three-eighths, with a rise of 14 feet, by two locks of 7 feet each. It is 28 feet wide at top, and 4 feet deep.

The act for making it received the royal assent in 1825, and is entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Cut or Canal, from the River Adur, at or near Binesbridge, in the parish of West Grinstead, in the county of Sussex, to Baybridge, in the said parish.'

The company of proprietors consisted of Lord Selsey, Sir Charles Merrick Burrell, Walter Burrell, William Peckham Woodward, John Wood, James Eversfield, and James Lancaster, who were incorporated by the name and style of "The Baybridge Canal Company." They were empowered to raise among themselves £6,000, in one hundred and twenty shares of £50 each, with a power of raising a further sum of p3,000, on mortgage of the rates, &c. which are as follows.

TONNAGE RATES.

Beech, Gravel, or other Materials used in the repair of Roads, Chalk, Dung, Mould, Soil, Compost or other Articles (except Lime) to be used for the manuring of Land 2d per Ton per Mile.
Goods, Wares, Articles, Commodities or Merchandize 5d ditto, ditto.

Fractions of a Ton and of a Mile, shall not be deemed less than a Quarter.
Wharfage of any Goods remaining less than Seventy-two Hours 9d per Ton.

The estimate for making this canal was made by May Upton, Esq. civil engineer, in 1824, and amounted to the sum of £5,957, 16s. 7d. The advantages arising from it are chiefly local, and consist of the increased facility by which manure may be brought into the interior, and the agricultural produce more easily disposed of.

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BEDFORD LEVEL.

THE description of the several rivers, canals, and navigable drains, within the limits of this extensive level, with the several acts, under authority of which, they have been executed, will be introduced in their respective places in alphabetical order.

BERWICK AND KELSO RAILWAY.

31 George III. Cap. 133, Royal Assent 31st May, 1811.

In the year 1811, an act was obtained to make a railway from Spittal, near Berwick, to Kelso, in Roxburgshire, entitled, 'An Act for making and maintaining a Railway from, or from near to, Spittal, in the county of Durham, to Kelso, in the county of Roxburgh; and for erecting and maintaining a Bridge over the River Tweed, from the parish of Norham, in the county of Durham, to the parish of Coldstream, in the county of Berwick.'

The line commences at Spittal, opposite the town of Berwick, on the south bank of the River Tweed, and continues parallel to the course of that river, by Tweedmouth, and East Ord, through the parish of Norham, to near Twisell, the seat of Sir Francis Blake, where it crosses the Tweed, and enters Scotland. Passing hence, by Kersfield, and to the north of Hirsel, the seat of the Earl of Home, it crosses the Leet Water, and thence, keeps the north bank of the Tweed, to its termination at Kelso.

At the time the act was obtained, there were one hundred and thirty-two subscribers, who were incorporated under the name of "The Berwick and Kelso Railway Company." They were empowered to raise among themselves £100,000, in one thousand shares of £100 each, with a further power of raising among themselves £50,000 in addition, or by promissory notes, under the common seal of the company; or they may raise the same, or any portion of it, on mortgage of the tolls authorized to be collected under the powers of this act.

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