Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
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Jim Shead's Waterways Information

An encyclopedia of the canals and rivers of England and Wales, including historical data, provided by Jim Shead, Waterways Writer and Photographer.

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Featured Pages

Birmingham Canal Museum Do we need one can we get one? Have a look and complete the survey to give your views. If you are organizing a UK canal or river event that you would like added to this list please let me know.

Today's Featured Waterway Photo

- Braunston Raven near lock No 3
For more information see Grand Union Main Line.

The Boat Listing is now hosted by CanalPlanAC. Please update your Favourites/Bookmarks to http://canalplan.org.uk/boats/

For more information about the Boat Listing see About the Boat Listing

If you are a newcomer to the subject, or this web site, you may want to start with my Introduction pages. These give an introduction to this website, the UK Waterways System, its history and to inland boating on canals or rivers.

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Books, videos, DVDs and links to other canal shopping sites.

For non-waterway travel photographs see www.jim-shead.net

I am also webmaster for the following waterways sites Railway & Canal Historical Society
The Association of Nene River Clubs
House of York

All about the Inland Waterways Association (IWA) click here

Quote of the day No 268

Tuesday 27 June 2017

Staircase locks are not separated by short stretches of water. The top gate of one lock is also the bottom gate of the next. Thus, once interned, a narrow boat needs no steering whatsoever. If left in forward gear when ascending it will even push open the relevant gates on its own, provided, of course, that the crew have let in the appropriate quantities of water. Unfortunately a boat going up a staircase cannot pass another coming down and so, at Foxton, the builders divided the works into two staircases of five locks each, with a short pool in between.

Alongside is the site of the celebrated Foxton Inclined Plane, a comparatively recent innovation, which was, alas, dismantled again shortly after its opening in 1900. Two great tanks would trundle sideways up and down a ramp on the hillside, the one counterbalancing the other. Ideally each caisson would contain two narrow boats, but traffic was sporadic even then. Keeping the winding engine in steam proved too expensive and in addition the contrivance was beset by mechanical troubles, usually the collapse of the steel rails upon which the tanks ran. For these reasons the Foxton lift was abandoned after a year or two.

John Liley - Journeys of the Swan

For more information about these daily quotations see About the Quote of the Day.

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Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
Text and photographs copyright of Jim Shead.
Home Introduction Waterways List Waterways Map Links Books DVD Articles Photo Gallery
Features Contact me Glossary Boats Events List History Local Waterways Help Photo List