Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
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Jim Shead's Waterways Information

An encyclopedia of the canals and rivers of England and Wales, including historical data, provided by Jim Shead, Waterways Writer and Photographer.

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Featured Pages

Birmingham Canal Museum Do we need one can we get one? Have a look and complete the survey to give your views. If you are organizing a UK canal or river event that you would like added to this list please let me know.

Today's Featured Waterway Photo

Anderton Lift Branch Junction
For more information see Trent and Mersey Canal.

The Boat Listing is now hosted by CanalPlanAC. Please update your Favourites/Bookmarks to http://canalplan.org.uk/boats/

For more information about the Boat Listing see About the Boat Listing

If you are a newcomer to the subject, or this web site, you may want to start with my Introduction pages. These give an introduction to this website, the UK Waterways System, its history and to inland boating on canals or rivers.

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Enter the Waterways Shopping Center

Books, videos, DVDs and links to other canal shopping sites.

For non-waterway travel photographs see www.jim-shead.net

I am also webmaster for the following waterways sites Railway & Canal Historical Society
The Association of Nene River Clubs
House of York

All about the Inland Waterways Association (IWA) click here

Quote of the day No 189

Sunday 26 February 2017

COAL made the industrial revolution, and the need for coal built the canals. The Wednesbury collieries were served by the Birmingham Canal, those at Cannock by the Wyrley & Essington, in south Derbyshire by the Cromford and the Nottingham; in Warwickshire by the Coventry. Moira coal moved on the Ashby; Silkstone on the Barnsley; Clifton and Kearsley on the Manchester, Bolton & Bury; Radstock on the Somersetshire Coal; south Wales production on the Monmouthshire, Glamorganshire, Neath and Swansea canals.

What did this mean in transport terms? In 1845 the Birmingham Canal Navigations carried just over 4 million tons of goods, of which over half was coal. About 68,000 narrow boats a year swam deep laden with it behind their sweating, plodding horses into Birmingham itself, or outwards from the mines towards Bromsgrove and Worcester, Stourport and the Severn, or to Warwick and the south. And the same number of boats came back, some lucky enough to get a return cargo in a hold from which the clinging coal-dust had been laboriously swilled, most going empty to queue once again for a load beneath the tips.

Charles Hadfield - The Canal Age

For more information about these daily quotations see About the Quote of the Day.

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Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
Text and photographs copyright of Jim Shead.
Home Introduction Waterways List Waterways Map Links Books DVD Articles Photo Gallery
Features Contact me Glossary Boats Events List History Local Waterways Help Photo List