Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
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Jim Shead's Waterways Information

An encyclopedia of the canals and rivers of England and Wales, including historical data, provided by Jim Shead, Waterways Writer and Photographer.

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Featured Pages

Birmingham Canal Museum Do we need one can we get one? Have a look and complete the survey to give your views. If you are organizing a UK canal or river event that you would like added to this list please let me know.

Today's Featured Waterway Photo

Longlees Lock No 36
For more information see Rochdale Canal.

The Boat Listing is now hosted by CanalPlanAC. Please update your Favourites/Bookmarks to http://canalplan.org.uk/boats/

For more information about the Boat Listing see About the Boat Listing

If you are a newcomer to the subject, or this web site, you may want to start with my Introduction pages. These give an introduction to this website, the UK Waterways System, its history and to inland boating on canals or rivers.

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Enter the Waterways Shopping Center

Books, videos, DVDs and links to other canal shopping sites.

For non-waterway travel photographs see www.jim-shead.net

I am also webmaster for the following waterways sites Railway & Canal Historical Society
The Association of Nene River Clubs
House of York

All about the Inland Waterways Association (IWA) click here

Quote of the day No 188

Saturday 30 July 2016

Arguments would develop at a lock between the crews of craft going opposite ways, as to which should use it first. Some companies installed distance posts at equal distances from the lock approaches, the boat to pass the post first having the right to the lock. Optimistic rules were made about how locks were to be worked. Horses were to be unhitched, and boats man-hauled or shafted into the locks to prevent them coming in too fast, stern ropes or straps should be used to check them before they could hit the far gates, and, in case they did, a roller or fender should be fitted to the bow, or a piece of wood held there as a protection. Paddles were not to be dropped without using a windlass, a boat was not to push the top gates open with her bow, nor were boatmen to use the paddles to flush the boat out of an empty lock. But, of course, boatmen in a hurry did all these things, though steerer Thomas Fox in 1802 was prosecuted for going too far, and

improperly drawing the water at Hatton Locks and, when remonstrated with (by lockkeeper Isaac Cashmore), stripping to fight.

Should there be a mishap, and a boat sink, the owner was responsible for the cost of draining the section of canal, and of raising it.

Charles Hadfield - The Canal Age

For more information about these daily quotations see About the Quote of the Day.

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Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
Text and photographs copyright of Jim Shead.
Home Introduction Waterways List Waterways Map Links Books DVD Articles Photo Gallery
Features Contact me Glossary Boats Events List History Local Waterways Help Photo List