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Portsmouth & Arundel Canal

Description: Was the last link in the inland route from London to Portsmouth, 28 miles and 6 locks from Ford on the River Arun, across Chichester Harbour to Portsea.

History: Authorised by an Act of 1817, fully opened in 1823. No traffic after 1906.

See Priestley's Navigable Rivers and Canals for more information.

January 1815

John Rennie

The Admiralty having been approached for approval of the scheme by the canal promoters asked him for his advice and he recommended acceptance.

January 1815

Francis John William Thomas Giles

Together with Netlam Giles he surveyed a route for the canal on behalf of John Rennie.

January 1815

Netlam Giles

Together with Francis Giles he surveyed a route for the canal on behalf of John Rennie.

Early January 1816

John Rennie

He employed Francis and Netlam Giles to survey the line on behalf of the canal promoters and reported to them proposing a barge canal from the tidal Arun at Ford to Salterns in Chchester Harbour, with a branch from Hunston to the city of Chichester. Existing dredged bargeways across Chichester Harbour would allow barges to sail or be towed to the Portsea island canal and a new 1½ mile cut with 2 locks would give access to Portsmouth Harbour. His estimate was 118,990 and later increased to 125,452.

January 1817

Authorised by an Act.

January 1823

Fully opened.

January 1827

Sir John Rennie

Reporting jointly with his brother he said that some of the Ford to Huston section of the canal had only been partially puddled, and part not at all, though it ran through soil 'incapable of holding water'. This lead to salt water damaging farmland. They also estimated it would cost 28,333 for the various works required on the navigation.

January 1827

George Rennie

Reporting jointly with his brother he said that some of the Ford to Huston section of the canal had only been partially puddled, and part not at all, though it ran through soil 'incapable of holding water'. This lead to salt water damaging farmland. They also estimated it would cost 28,333 for the various works required on the navigation.

Late July 1827

Sir John Rennie

He reported with his brother on the Portsea Canal saying " there was no water in it , nor has it, we understand, been used to any considerable extent on account of the very defective manner in which it has been executed, as it is incapable of holding water."

Late July 1827

George Rennie

He reported with his brother on the Portsea Canal saying " there was no water in it , nor has it, we understand, been used to any considerable extent on account of the very defective manner in which it has been executed, as it is incapable of holding water."

January 1906

No traffic after 1906.

January 1986

London's Lost Route to the Sea by P A L Vine, (4th edition) Published by David & Charles.

January 1995

London to Portsmouth Waterway by P A L Vine, Published by Middleton Press - Limited but informative text with maps.

 

Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
Text and photographs copyright of Jim Shead.
Home Introduction Waterways List Waterways Map Links Books DVD Articles Photo Gallery
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